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‘Hot-saucing' couple to pay damages to their kids

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‘Hot-saucing' couple to pay damages to their kids
14:22 CEST+02:00
A couple in Norrtälje, north of Stockholm, was sentenced to pay damages to their kids after forcing them to swallow Tabasco sauce as punishment for telling lies.

“As this is a case of small and defenceless children the offence cannot be regarded as minor,” wrote one of the judges in passing sentence.

According to the children, the hot sauce was painful to swallow and made it feel as if their mouths were “on fire”.

The matter came to light after one of the two kids told the school nurse about the method of punishment. After she had filed a report, the police instigated an investigation and the parents were subsequently charged with assault.

During the trial the parents testified that the children had been “unruly” and frequently told lies.

When the couple didn't manage to curb the perceived bad behaviour through withholding sweets, revoking TV privileges or grounding the children, they agreed to administer a drop of Tabasco per lie to the children.

The method of child correction by "hot-saucing" their tongues has been debated by parents in the US since a book on child discipline promoting the method was published in 2000.

The method, which some claim has its roots in the southern states of the US, has divided parents across borders and had celebrities like TV's Dr Phil up in arms.

The Norrtälje parents were given a suspended sentence and were fined the equivalent of 60 day's income each. They must also pay 15,000 kronor ($2,380) to the children.

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