SHARE
COPY LINK

MILITARY

Swedish soldiers secure missing pea soup dinner

Deviating from the Swedish tradition of serving pea soup on Thursdays turned out to be an expensive mistake for caterers to the Swedish Armed Forces (Försvarsmakten).

Swedish soldiers secure missing pea soup dinner

The Blekinge county wing, stationed in southern Sweden, recently decided to change their restaurants’ caterer after heavy criticism from soldiers missing the traditional Thursday fare, according to regional newspaper Blekinge Läns Tidning.

The soldiers disliked the small portions they received, and were displeased when the traditional pea soup was taken off the menu one Thursday too many, replaced with sausage stew and fish dishes.

Pea soup is traditionally served for Thursday’s dinner, along with pancakes for afters.

The Swedish Armed Forces have long been soup-enthusiasts, and have even boasted their own line of canned pea soup, known as “Försvarets ärtsoppa” sold in well-stocked Swedish supermarkets.

Sodexho, the catering firm that had provided the Blekinge Wing’s food for the last four years, have thus lost a contract worth roughly 300 million kronor ($47 million).

From now on, catering company Scandinavian Facility Management will be in charge of the menu, which is likely to include pea soup and pancakes on Thursdays.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

NATO

Turkey forms ‘permanent committee’ to assess Swedish Nato deal

Turkey on Thursday said a new "permanent committee" would meet Finnish and Swedish officials in August to assess if the two nations are complying with Ankara's conditions to ratify their Nato membership bids.

Turkey forms 'permanent committee' to assess Swedish Nato deal

Finland and Sweden dropped their history of military non-alignment and announced plans to join Nato after Russia invaded Ukraine at the end of
February. All 30 Nato members must ratify the accession.

Nato member Turkey has demanded the extradition of dozens of suspected “terrorists” from both countries under an accession deal the three signed last month.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has threatened to “freeze” the process over Sweden and Finland’s failure to extradite the suspects.

He accuses them of providing a haven for outlawed Kurdish militants. “If these countries are not implementing the points included in the
memorandum that we signed, we will not ratify the accession protocol,” Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu reaffirmed in a televised interview.

He said the committee would meet in August but provided no details.Turkey’s parliament has broken for its summer recess and will not be able
to hold a ratification vote before October. Some Turkish officials have warned that the process may drag out until next year.

SHOW COMMENTS