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Nurse pressed vomit down patient’s throat

Elderly patients at a nursing home had their own vomit pressed down their throats and were given hard pinches and slaps.

Two nurses at a home in Norrköping, in central Sweden, harassed their patients both verbally and physically. The scandal was revealed in March, but the two nurses are already back at work, according to local newspaper Folkbladet.

“This is a trauma for all of our employees,” said Eva Abrahamsson, manager and the recipient of the complaints against the nurses, to Folkbladet.

“We’ve cried, and we’ve all ransacked our consciences. We’re talking about defenseless people, who have to place their trust in us.”

When a patient protested against the nurse’s painfully hard grip, the nurse responded “don’t touch me with your disgusting fingers,” and “you’re lying where you are, and I’d like to see you try to catch up with me,” reports Folkbladet.

On another occasion, the same nurse chose not to clean up a patient’s vomit, instead deciding to press the vomit back into the patient’s mouth, using a bib.

The other nurse slapped a patient hard on the behind, pinched her stomach and shook her breasts, and pressed another patient’s fist into her mouth.

This gruesome maltreatment, taking place over two days in March, was discovered by another employee, who then reported it.

The behaviour of the two nurses was deemed so serious that it resulted in no fewer than five Lex Sarah reports, a law obliging staff in the care industry to report instances of mistreatment to social services.

Despite this, the two nurses are now back at work after a suspension of two months for one nurse, and three weeks for the other.

“The personnel department didn’t think there was sufficient cause to fire them,” said Teresa Påhlsson, district manager of another area in Norrköping municipality, to newspaper Svenska Dagbladet (SvD).

“The nurses will, of course, be under scrutiny. All of the staff are aware of the situation. That’s the good thing with them being back in the same place,” said Påhlsson to SvD.

All the relatives of the maltreated elderly patients have been informed of what has happened apart from one. The vomiting patient passed away before the investigation was over.

The nurses are now working with the same elderly patients as before the incidents occurred.

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Police probe mystery death at Swedish care home after spate of overdoses

Police are investigating one case of murder and two attempted murders at a care home in the west of Sweden, after a doctor raised the alarm about suspicious insulin overdoses.

Police probe mystery death at Swedish care home after spate of overdoses
At least of the women did not normally receive insulin injections. Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT
“There is one man who died in connection to the events,” Stina Lundqvist, the prosecutor in the case, told the local Göteborgs Tidning newspaper.
 
“All of these three people who received a medication which they were not supposed to have, according to what they were prescribed,” she added in an interview with Swedish state radio broadcaster SR
 
“We are investigating the events as attempted murder,” she told Sweden's TT newswire, which reported that it could be a case of active euthanasia, which is illegal in Sweden, although the prosecutor did not comment.
 
The doctor reported his suspicions to the police after two women from the same section of the care home were admitted to the hospital, both suffering from extremely low blood sugar. 
 
“Through giving the plaintiff insulin, someone has caused her to lose consciousness and stop breathing,” a senior doctor at the hospital wrote in a police report.
 
The doctor added that the woman would not have been capable of administering the insulin herself. 
 
In January this year, a third resident from the same section of the same care home, was also admitted to the hospital suffering from low blood sugar. It was then that police put a prosecutor on the case. 
 
“It's unlikely to be a coincidence because it is all from the same section and is the same type of event,” Lundqvist told TT.
 
“But it's a slightly special case. We can't say with confidence that this is an attempted murder. That's something we hope the investigation will shed some light on.” 
 
“There are certain elements which suggest a crime has been committed, although exactly what evidence this is, I cannot go into at present.” 
 
 
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At least one of the women did not normally take insulin, and another was admitted with a type of insulin in her body different from that which she was prescribed. 
 
According to a report in a local newspaper, a police search of the home found two empty insulin pens containing fast-acting insulin which were not registered in the home's records. 
 
Lundqvist said it was a “complicated investigation”, as many of the staff who worked at the home at the time had already moved on. 
 
“We have no one at present we could reasonably call a suspect, but of course there are people we are looking closely at,” she said. “It's of course a natural part of our investigation to look at who has been working at the home when all the events took place.” 
 
The prosecutor in the case, Stina Lundqvist, says there is not yet a suspect. Photo: Adam Ihse/Exponera
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