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CIA rendition deportee: 'Sweden is responsible'

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CIA rendition deportee: 'Sweden is responsible'
An undated file photo of Ahmed Agiza
09:12 CEST+02:00
Ahmed Agiza, who was flown out of Sweden to Egypt by the CIA in 2001 where he was imprisoned until last week, has claimed that Sweden needs to take responsibility for what happened to him.

Agiza met with several representatives of the Swedish media in Cario on the condition that he not be asked about the circumstances surrounding his 2001 forced deportation.

He, along with fellow Egyptian national Mohammed Alzery, were forcibly handed over to the CIA by Swedish security service agents as part of a so called terror suspect “rendition” operation carried out by the US spy agency.

The deportations were criticised by both the United Nations and several human rights groups.

“I see this is Sweden's responsibility because they made the decision despite that they knew what the Egyptians would do,” Agiza told Sveriges Radio (SR).

Karlstad-resident Agiza spent almost ten years in a cell in the Tora prison in Cairo, convicted by a military court of having been a member of a terror-linked organisation.

The decision to release Agiza was made by the social democratic government in Egypt at the behest of the United States and has been welcomed by international human rights organizations.

However, he has several lasting injuries from the torture he suffered while in Egyptian prison. Among other things, his nose was broken, making it difficult for him to breath.

“I've been able to meet with a specialist at a centre for torture injuries to receive help. The problem is that my brain is in high gear even when I sleep,” he told TV4.

Two years ago, Agiza had his application for a Swedish residency permit denied based on secret information held by Swedish security service Säpo.

Agiza claims that he's never been a threat.

“I'm no terrorist, I'm not some sort of security risk for Sweden,” he told Sveriges Television (SVT).

Agiza and Alzery have received 3 million kronor ($464,000) each in compensation from the Swedish state.

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