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HOUSING

‘Stockholm needs more housing – not fewer students’

Sweden's housing minister is wrong to single out students as the solution to help alleviate pressure in Stockholm's housing market, argue Young Moderates Veronica de Jonge and Edvin Alam.

'Stockholm needs more housing - not fewer students'

Sweden’s housing minister Stefan Attefall on Wednesday told potential students that they should avoid studying in Stockholm to ease pressure on housing in the Swedish capital. He even went as far as to propose cutting the number of student places in the city.

These comments are absurd and threaten the region’s future growth – and with it jobs and public services.

We agree that other municipalities, universities and colleges should do more to kick-start the building of student housing. It is unreasonable for the City of Stockholm to bear the entire burden: all the municipalities of Stockholm County have to make their contribution.

At the last election, we in the Moderate Party promised to build 4,600 new student apartments during the following term. This was a worthy aim, but population growth in the Stockholm area means that this target needs to be revised upwards to at least 30,000 new student homes by 2018.

Suburban municipalities in the Stockholm area also need to take some initiative. The overall housing shortage in Stockholm is a serious threat to growth, but the shortages of student housing could lead more people to choose to study elsewhere, meaning we will lose important talent and future growth.

We often say that ‘Sweden grows when Stockholm grows’. When Stockholm shrinks, you can imagine the consequences.

We now need the YIMBY-coalition to advance. Even in this growing metropolitan area there are plenty of people who think Stockholm is full – and who will use various means to appeal.

According to Stockholm mayor Sten Nordin, the various appeals processes will lead to building projects being delayed by an average of one year. We need to review the right to appeal and speed up decision-making processes. We also need Moderates who dare to fight for the building of new, green residential areas.

As well as making it easier to build, it also needs to be made cheaper to build and live in student housing. The centre-right parties, led by housing minister Stefan Attefall, need to reduce costs by abolishing property tax on student housing and by halving the value added tax (VAT) on construction in general, thus making it cheaper for construction companies to build more housing.

We want the whole of Stockholm to continue to develop, both the city centre and the suburban municipalities, so that people with dreams and ideas can move here.

Stockholm needs to be a region where people’s desire to educate themselves and generate ideas helps create new jobs and better public services.

The problem is not that there are too many students in Stockholm – the problem is that the rising population is not being matched by more housing.

Veronica de Jonge

Chairperson, Moderate Students at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)

Edvin Alam

Member of the Moderate Youth (MUF) working group for labour market policy

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HOUSING

INTERVIEW: International students ‘vulnerable’ to Swedish housing shortages

People moving to Malmö to study now have to wait as long as a year to receive accommodation, Milena Milosavljević, the president of the Student Union in the city, has told The Local. The situation, she says, is "urgent and acute".

INTERVIEW: International students 'vulnerable' to Swedish housing shortages

The Sofa Project, run by the Student Union Malmö, received 80 applications this year from students who wanted to rent short-term accommodation, showing just how acute the current housing shortage is.

These 80 applicants were vying for one of seven spots, ranging from a spare room to a sofa bed – from hosts who sign up to offer their spaces to new arrivals.  As the programme only had seven hosts registered this year, the project had to close its application page to others, otherwise the number would have surpassed 80.

“They are ready to come to Malmö and sleep on a sofa bed at a stranger’s house before they find accommodation,” Milosavljević told The Local. 

Malmö recently received a red designation from the Swedish National Union of Students, which publishes an annual report assessing the housing situation in university towns and cities across Sweden. A red designation means that finding suitable accommodation as a student takes more than one semester. The report found that 61 percent of students live in a city that has been designated a red ranking.

READ ALSO: Sweden’s student union warns that housing shortages are back this semester

“The reality of Malmö and the reason why it became red is that to find suitable accommodation you have to wait up to a year,” Milosavljević said.

Some individuals, she said might have to wait up to three years to find their own accommodation, making do with second-hand contracts, long commutes, and living with family members in the meantime. For newly-arrived international students, who lack personal numbers when they move here and so cannot join Swedish housing queues, looking for suitable housing becomes a complex task.

“International students are more vulnerable because they don’t have a personal number to enter the system before they come to Sweden,” Milosavljević explained.

Milosavljević herself moved to Malmö as an international, fee-paying student. Because she paid tuition, she was offered housing by Malmö University. Based in part on her own experience, Milosavljević explained that the housing issue cannot be reduced to a shortage in the number of flats and rooms. There is also a shortage of appropriate housing options for different needs.

“They offered me accommodation in a student building,” she said. “Not an apartment, but a room – and I came with my husband. The room was not enough for two of us.”

Student accommodation must accommodate the different needs of different members of the student body, Milosavljević said, including those who move with partners or spouses, or even with their children.

In the past year, one new student apartment building was built in Malmö, with 94 new spaces for the city’s student body. This is inadequate, Milosavljević said. While Malmö is growing, and there is residential construction being carried out around the city, it is unclear how many of those new buildings will prioritise the city’s student population.

The city’s student population, too, is growing. As the pandemic era ended in Sweden, students returned to campus. And new students joined them. While student ranks grew, housing options remained stagnant.

“From our perspective from the Student Union, we have talked about, in the previous years, how the situation after the pandemic is going to get even worse for the students,” Milosavljević said. “There’s an increase of students coming back, new students, and already not even enough housing.”

Milosavljević has fielded calls and emails from students who say that they cannot move to Malmö because they cannot find housing.

“They are already working on it,” Milosavljević told The Local of the university’s response.

There are plans to create more housing for international students, but these proposals focus mainly on students from European Union, leaving other international students out. All international students should be given priority for student accommodation, Milosavljević said, because none of them have access to the Swedish housing market.

“I do believe strongly that the City of Malmö and Malmö University need to have urgent negotiations and start building straight away,” she said.

Because Malmö University is a public university, it must follow the lead of the Ministry of Education and Research. Milosavljević acknowledged that in the aftermath of Sweden’s recent elections, which put the right-bloc in power, student housing shortages might not rank highly on a list of national priorities.

“The Student Union Malmö considers this situation quite urgent and acute,” Milosavljević said. “We are more than prepared to sit down and talk so we can actually do something, instead of just having meetings. The students will continue to suffer if the living conditions and the bostad [housing] situation in Malmö is not improved.”

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