• Sweden's news in English

Humans bred with Archaic peoples: study

TT/The Local · 1 Nov 2011, 16:42

Published: 01 Nov 2011 16:42 GMT+01:00

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

The study shows that the sexual interaction, between Archaic homo sapiens who lived in the period beginning 300,000 years ago, occurred to a greater extent than previously thought, shedding light on the history of modern humans.

The Swedish study, published in the journal Pnas, presents evidence that south-east Asian and southern Chinese have genes from the Denisovans, who were an Archaic peoples.

"It is a little controversial. But we have made use of more powerful methods than those used for before," said Mattias Jakobsson, one of the researchers at Uppsala University, told the local Uppsala Nya Tidning daily.

Previous studies have indicated that modern humans outside Africa have some genetic similarities with Neanderthals, and that Australian Aboriginals and residents on the island of New Guinea have common genetic traits with Denisovans.

The new study thus shows that genetic traces from the Denisovans can also be found in residents of the mainland Asian continent.

"This shows that Archaic and modern humans were not as isolated as was previously thought," said researcher Pontus Skoglund to the newspaper. "Together with previous studies this indicates that our genetic inheritance is a mosaic of from various pre-historic populations."

Story continues below…

Little is known about the Denisovans, who are named after a find in the Denisova Cave in Russia in 2008.

The anatomical features of the Denisovans remains unknown as the only physical remains hitherto found are a fingerbone and tooth.

TT/The Local (news@thelocal.se)

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

Your comments about this article

18:20 November 1, 2011 by Svensksmith
That explains a few things.
19:01 November 1, 2011 by procrustes
Only to an idiot.

Well over 95% of pearly white blond blue-eye Sweden Democrat DNA is in common with the great ape.

Oh, and that goes for the rest of us, too.
19:46 November 1, 2011 by Tanskalainen
Norwegians have troll genes.
22:30 November 1, 2011 by wxman
Nothing like a good hump with a hot Neanderthal babe to start the day off right!
04:06 November 2, 2011 by Smiling Canuk
Yeah, some of the women I've been with were real neanderthals for sure.
04:35 November 2, 2011 by Uncommon Sense
What examples do we have of two different species actually mating and producing offspring which is not sterile?

How long do bone fragments survive exposure in this world anyway? Seems 300,000 years is a very long time.

Maybe all this is science fiction and someone is testing to see if we are stupid enough to buy the next book to come out just in time for Christmas!
05:56 November 2, 2011 by Investor612

You have that backwards. The DNA indicates most of the mixing came from Neanderthal men. Hmmmmm.
08:57 November 2, 2011 by karex
@uncommon sense

The old definition of species that is based on the ability to reproduce fertile offspring is today considered simplistic and inadequate. Other factors are now taken into account including DNA and characteristic features such as jutting chins, rounded foreheads, height of cheekbone placement, etc. It is possible that different species can mate and produce fertile offspring when these species belong to the same Genus. In this case, Denisovans, Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens all belong to the genus Homo.

Bone fragments can survive an extraordinary long time depending on the conditions of the environment where they are preserved. In 2009 the remains of a mammoth was discovered in Serbia which dates back 4.8 million years... Remians preserved in very dry places can last a long time, as well as in peat bogs. Glaciers can in theory preserve remians forever as long as not thawed. And the advantage of remains found in glaciers is that they are extraordinarily preserved and include a wealth of original characteristics which can include teeth, hair and even skin.
09:13 November 2, 2011 by Lavaux
If the Denisovians and Neanderthals didn't come from Africa (as the Homo Sapiens allegedly did), where did they come from?

The other day I was looking at a diagram showing the evolution of modern men from apes, with arrows pointing from each fossil to the next. Where did the arrows come from?
10:29 November 2, 2011 by bourgeoisieboheme
Actually we think of Neanderthals as primitive to Homo Sapiens but that is proving more and more to be incorrect. We assume since they are all gone they were not as smart, truth might be they were less aggressive and were wiped out by homo sapiens. They have larger brains so it is thought they might have been smarter, which usually means less violent. True, European and East Asians have shown to have Neanderthal genes in their DNA. So take from that what you will...
10:52 November 2, 2011 by Sommar

The ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans actually also came from Africa. They just moved out of Africa before Homo sapiens moved out. They then evolved on separate lineages in Europe and Asia, and then interbred with Homo sapiens when they expanded through their territory. The exact descent of Neanderthals and Denisovans are unknown but it is thought that the last ancestor they shared with Homo sapiens (before later interbreeding) was Homo rhodesiensis that lived 700K to 1 million years ago in Africa
20:20 November 2, 2011 by swedejane
No news here...there's a modern version of it all around us, whenever I see a beautiful western woman with an arab man I think the same thing: human and neanderthal mating.
04:20 November 3, 2011 by Da Goat
this is another waste of time and money the neanderthals and denisovans are still walking around with us to this day !

this is just evolutionary imagineings
21:58 November 3, 2011 by yourkidding
Judging by the closed mindedness a bunch of manniskor have towards "new" people...Humans bred with Archaic peoples = Swedes
04:04 November 5, 2011 by MitchT
This explains my boss.
Today's headlines
Dylan removes Nobel-mention from website
The American musician has more or less responded to the news with silence. Photo: Per Wahlberg

American singer-song writer Bob Dylan has removed any mention of him being named one of this year’s Nobel Prize laureates on his official website.

Refugee crisis
Asylum requests in Sweden down by 70 percent
Sweden's migration minister Morgan Johansson. Photo: Christine Olsson/TT

Sweden received 70 percent fewer requests for asylum in the period between January and September 2016 than it did during the same time last year, the country’s justice and migration minister Morgan Johansson has revealed.

The unique story of Stockholm's floating libraries
The Stockholm archipelago book boat. Photo: Roger Hill.

Writer Roger Hill details his journeys on the boats that carry books over Stockholm's waterways and to its most remote places.

Refugee crisis
Second Stockholm asylum centre fire in a week
The new incident follows a similar fire in Fagersjö last week (pictured). Photo: Johan Nilsson/TT

Police suspect arson in the blaze, as well as a similar incident which occurred last Sunday.

More misery for Ericsson as losses pile up
Ericsson interim CEO Jan Frykhammar presenting its third quarter results. Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT

The bad news just keeps coming from the Swedish telecoms giant.

Facebook 'sorry' for removing Swedish cancer video
A computer displaying Facebook's landing page. Photo: Christine Olsson/TT

The social media giant had censored a video explaining how women should check for suspicious lumps in their breasts.

Watch this amazing footage of Sweden’s landscapes
A still from the aerial footage of Sweden. Photo: Nate Summer-Cook

The spectacular drone footage captures both Sweden's south and the opposite extreme, thousands of kilometres north.

Sweden could be allowed to keep border controls: EU
Police ID checks at Hyllie station in southern Sweden. Photo: Stig-Åke Jönsson/TT

Sweden could be allowed to keep ID controls on its border with Denmark beyond the current end date of November, following discussions among EU leaders in Brussels last night.

Why women in Sweden will work for free by November
File photo of a woman working in a Swedish office. Photo: Anders Willund/TT

A new study into the gender pay gap suggests Sweden still has some work to do.

Look familiar? Meet your jawbone's ancestor
Thank God for evolution, eh?

There's something fishy about the human jawbone – it has its origins in the placodermi, a jowly species of fish that lived 400 million years ago, Swedish and Chinese researchers say.

Sponsored Article
This is Malmö: Football capital of Sweden
Fury at plans that 'threaten the IB's survival' in Sweden
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
Here's where it could snow in central Sweden this weekend
Analysis & Opinion
Are we just going to let half the country die?
Blog updates

6 October

10 useful hjälpverb (The Swedish Teacher) »

"Hej! I think the so-called “hjalpverb” (auxiliary verbs in English) are a good way to get…" READ »


8 July

Editor’s blog, July 8th (The Local Sweden) »

"Hej readers, It has, as always, been a bizarre, serious and hilarious week in Sweden. You…" READ »

Sponsored Article
7 reasons you should join Sweden's 'a-kassa'
Angry elk chases Swede up a lamp post
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
The Local Voices
'Alienation in Sweden feels better: I find myself a stranger among scores of aliens'
People-watching: October 20th
The Local Voices
A layover at Qatar airport brought this Swedish-Kenyan couple together - now they're heading for marriage
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Swede punches clown that scared his grandmother
Sponsored Article
Swedish for programmers: 'It changed my life'
Fans throw flares and enter pitch in Swedish football riot
Could Swedish blood test solve 'Making a Murderer'?
Sponsored Article
Top 7 tips to help you learn Swedish
Property of the week: Linnéstaden, Gothenburg
Sponsored Article
How to vote absentee from abroad in the US elections
Swedish school to build gender neutral changing room
People-watching: October 14th-16th
Sponsored Article
'There was no future for me in Turkey'
Man in Sweden assaulted by clowns with broken bottle
Sponsored Article
‘Extremism can't be defeated on the battlefield alone’
Nobel Prize 2016: Literature
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Watch the man who discovered Bob Dylan react to his Nobel Prize win
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
Record numbers emigrating from Sweden
Sponsored Article
'There was no future for me in Turkey'
People-watching: October 12th
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
The Local Voices
'Swedish startups should embrace newcomers' talents - there's nothing to fear'
Sponsored Article
Last chance to vote absentee in the US elections
How far right are the Sweden Democrats?
Property of the week: Triangeln, Malmö
Sweden unveils Europe's first elk hut
People-watching: October 7th-9th
The Local Voices
Syria's White Helmets: The Nobel Peace Prize would have meant a lot, but pulling a child from rubble is the greatest reward
Missing rune stone turns up in Sweden
Nobel Prize 2016: Chemistry
jobs available