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Man jailed for kicking mother-in-law to death

TT/The Local/gm · 24 Dec 2011, 08:47

Published: 24 Dec 2011 08:47 GMT+01:00

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The 38-year-old from Borås, in western Sweden, received a three-year prison sentence for the assault which was, according to prosecutors, the culmination of a prolonged campaign of physical and mental abuse against the woman and her daughter, his former wife.

The man had been attempting to defraud the Borås city council by claiming that he had been working as his mother-in-law’s personal assistant.

He had forced her to falsify time sheets and allegedly coerced his wife into going along with the plan.

However a row broke out, during which the man kicked his mother-in-law in the chest.

She died from subsequent injuries, which included broken ribs and chest bones.

The prosecutor argued that as the man knew he was capable of killing the 60-year-old with such a powerful kick, he should face a murder charge.

Instead he was acquitted of murder and instead convicted of the lesser charges of aggravated assault and involuntary manslaughter.

The outcome of the case was slammed by the chief prosecutor Sven Urban Kvist, who had been pressing for a sentence of at least 10 years.

Story continues below…

“I am not satisfied with the sentence. He was only convicted of aggravated assault and it should have been considerably longer than three years,” he told local newspaper Borås Tidning.

In addition to the charge against his mother-in-law, the man was also convicted of assaulting his ex-wife and her sister and was ordered to pay them damages of 180,000 kronor ($26,000).

TT/The Local/gm (news@thelocal.se)

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Your comments about this article

10:39 December 24, 2011 by Swedishmyth
3 years? Only in Sweden. I've never seen a country so enamored by the guilty, and so indifferent toward the innocent.
11:27 December 24, 2011 by Keith #5083
In the normal way of life, one could think that a 'son-in-law' could get very emotional in a row.

However, in this case it appears it was the convicted man who manipulated, oppressed and terrorised this 60 year old woman.

The details shown here suggest that other crimes were also committed by this man: extortion, attempted fraud, blackmail, repeated assaults

It is to be hoped that this sentence will be appealed and that further charges will be brought against this perpetrator.
11:28 December 24, 2011 by mansson248
I find it annoying with such low punishment for abuse against females.
17:24 December 24, 2011 by heyheyhey
The value placed on the life of a victim, in Sweden, is laughable.

What the hell is wrong with your criminal justice system.

Guess I won't waste any of my tourist money in Swede, as there is no consequence for anyone who might want to rob and murder me.

00:26 December 25, 2011 by Tennin
Terribly disgusting, that he gets away with killing someone with only 3 years.
05:34 December 25, 2011 by johnoleson
Without the existence of God, this would be just another unrequited crime against humanity. As the Swedish courts are consistently unable to deliver just sentences, our Creator will in the afterlife (unless the murderer receives forgiveness through Jesus Christ, but it is not the judges call). Without this knowledge of God, all we have to hang on to is liberalism.
11:16 December 25, 2011 by zooeden
This story makes me want to throw up! Way to go with the legal system!

The new order should be: Dont go to Mexico anymore, go to Sweden where the law is weak and friendly!!!
15:26 December 25, 2011 by t64
This is evidence of the new Sweden and the two tiered justice system. Native Swede's under the traditional west based law, vs, Immigrant Swede's under sharia law. The real conflict only arises when one has to judge between a new Swede and a native Swede. That conflict, too will diminish through time as the progression of liberal policies becomes more mainstream. :-(
17:40 December 25, 2011 by Kimmage
We need Charles Bronson!!
23:29 December 25, 2011 by Reason abd Realism
Anyone who wants to kill someone can do so in Sweden, and the only consequences are a modest fee and 2 years of group hugs from a team of therapists in a so-called Swedish prison.

The Swedish legal system has utterly and completely lost any semblence of deterrence. There is absolutely nothing in Swedish sentencing to make a would-be murderer think twice before pulling the trigger on his victims.

In fact murderers themselves quickly become 'the victim' to the Swedish lefttist, who rush to his defense, and completely ignore the real victims and their families.

Why are these leftist Swedes not angry that the victim's family has not received greater compensation from the criminal? Are these leftists unaware that the emotional scars and financial hardship to the family of the victim can last a lifetime?
01:04 December 26, 2011 by Chickybee
The saddest thing of all is that a life is becoming cheaper and cheaper - but we will wake up to this :-)
10:23 December 26, 2011 by HYBRED
After reading this article, I wonder how many are thinking about wanting to introduce this guy to their mother in law.
17:41 December 26, 2011 by t64
This punishment by western standards was insultingly lenient but for muslim's was quite standard if not a small bit on the harsh side. In muslim culture, that Sweden find very important to import, it is a man's prerogative to deal with his family as he sees fit. A harsher punishment just might have set off a major ethnic disturbance where many more innocents would have suffered injury or death. The judge was being prudent since he would have been the object of criticism no matter how he ruled under the current Swedish culture.
19:25 December 26, 2011 by mafketis
"I've never seen a country so enamored by the guilty, and so indifferent toward the innocent. "

Since they're dead and beyond redemption the Swedish legal system doesn't care about victims of criminals. Survivors are also liable to be law-abiding and therefore useless as experimental material.

But the murderer? All that potential for gentle government mandated personality improvement? What enthusiast of the nanny state could resist? And just think if he only breaks several limbs in his next attack the nanny state can claim to have made a difference! As long as he remains a dangerous and violent thug he'll got lots of benevolent attention.
00:19 December 27, 2011 by DAVID T
Well we don't know who started it
03:42 December 27, 2011 by johnoleson
True, but we do know who finished it and I'm sure he will learn one of life's valuable lessons with limited freedom for three years. That will teach him.
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