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SWEDISH-SAUDI ARMS DEAL

MILITARY

Swedish military ‘sold’ arms to Saudi Arabia

Much of the Swedish weaponry sold to Saudi Arabia in recent years actually came from the Swedish Armed Forces (Försvarsmakten), according to a new report.

Swedish military 'sold' arms to Saudi Arabia

Many of the sights, mounts, and anti-tank missiles sold by Swedish defence firm Saab to Saudi Arabia came from the Swedish military, the Dagens Industri (DI) newspaper reported.

Following years of cutbacks, the Swedish Armed Forces found itself with a growing surplus of military equipment.

Saab proposed purchasing the materiel from the Swedish military in order to in turn sell it to Saudi Arabia.

Specifically, DI cites a deal by Saab in December 2007, when the company announced an order for several anti-tank missiles.

The paper revealed in 2010 that the buyer was Saudi Arabia, but sources now tell the paper that many of the related mounts and sights actually came from Swedish army warehouses.

According to DI, public documents support the claim that Saab paid the Swedish military for the surplus equipment with the intent of then selling it to Saudi Arabia.

The revelations come following reports last week that Sweden had planned to help build an arms factory in Saudi Arabia, a project which DI reported is directly linked to the sale of the surplus Swedish materiel.

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NATO

Turkey forms ‘permanent committee’ to assess Swedish Nato deal

Turkey on Thursday said a new "permanent committee" would meet Finnish and Swedish officials in August to assess if the two nations are complying with Ankara's conditions to ratify their Nato membership bids.

Turkey forms 'permanent committee' to assess Swedish Nato deal

Finland and Sweden dropped their history of military non-alignment and announced plans to join Nato after Russia invaded Ukraine at the end of
February. All 30 Nato members must ratify the accession.

Nato member Turkey has demanded the extradition of dozens of suspected “terrorists” from both countries under an accession deal the three signed last month.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has threatened to “freeze” the process over Sweden and Finland’s failure to extradite the suspects.

He accuses them of providing a haven for outlawed Kurdish militants. “If these countries are not implementing the points included in the
memorandum that we signed, we will not ratify the accession protocol,” Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu reaffirmed in a televised interview.

He said the committee would meet in August but provided no details.Turkey’s parliament has broken for its summer recess and will not be able
to hold a ratification vote before October. Some Turkish officials have warned that the process may drag out until next year.

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