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Swedes in new push to curb dog-on-dog violence

13 Jul 2012, 11:06

Published: 13 Jul 2012 11:06 GMT+02:00

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The group, Stoppa Oplanerade & Ofrivilliga Hundmöten (‘Stop unplanned and involuntary dog encounters’), was started on Facebook by Hubbe’s owners and breeders after a vicious attack killed the beloved canine.

"There's nothing wrong with letting dogs run loose (if there isn't any requirement for a leash), but to not call them ahead of a meeting and take responsibility and have control over one's dog is irresponsible and betrays a lack of respect," the group writes on its Facebook page.

After an official website was launched and a petition started, the group has slowly been gaining popularity in their hopes of preventing unleashed dogs from coming into contact with one another.

“The tragic background is really what happened on Saturday, July 2nd when Hubbe the Border Terrier took his last walk,” said Maria Nilsson, head of the group to the Nyheter24 website.

“Hubbe’s owner tied him up and walked away just like many times before, but life was never the same afterwards,” she said, adding that Hubbe was then attacked by two unleashed bigger dogs, causing injuries which ultimately proved fatal.

The group has worked with mapping dog attacks in Sweden that have occurred since 2006, statistics they claim are not recorded properly.

The map includes the locations of the attacks, as well as details of each attack.

“The work with the map has been sluggish, but I’m hopeful that we’ll get more information,” she told the website, adding that all dog encounters should be planned, not unplanned.

The group is selling the fruits of their labours, stickers with dog attack maps, for 55 kronor each ($7.80) through their website.

Story continues below…

“And we’re serious, we’re not going to give up, tire, or back down from the discussions,” Nilsson told the website.

The Local/og


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Your comments about this article

12:23 July 13, 2012 by Rod Munch
Hmmmm. I wonder which group of "new Swedes" this is attributed to??
13:23 July 13, 2012 by Snoopy!
Curb the attacks when band the breeds & implement a 3 strikes & your out law

( Brisbane Qld ) shining example of how to properly control cretinous dog owners with their feeble attempts at building a non existent macho image with mongrel %^#^%#% fnn dogs that deserve nothing less than a bullet.

Dont get me started on its the owner not the dog, its a combination of the two.

Some dogs simply should not be bred , just like some humans shouldn't either.
13:55 July 13, 2012 by RadioBob
...this is why we have "leash laws" in the U.S.
14:16 July 13, 2012 by fakeempire
Nearly 90-95% of the time it is the owner, not the dog. You have to work with your dog to figure out how it does in many situations and then work to correct those situations. I am a professional dog walker, and too many times do I see owners who defend their dogs and say "My dog can never do this or that because of its breed and instinct. Or because a traumatic experience happened in the past... etc" That is BS. You can train any dog if you train them properly and really work with it. If you can't train it then it is your fault and not the dogs. You need to be patient and make sure you are using the right methods (there are many training methods that can work for dogs) if you want to change and control your dog. It could take days or months.

I have an excellent dog that can be off leash and listen to me when I call her and she is very submissive, and knows I am the "leader". She didn't used to be this way (she used to run off and not listen) but it took months of constant training to get her here.

If your dog was attacked once then yes it is going to have problems encountering other dogs after the traumatic experience but it can still be trained and taught to not respond viciously when approaching new dogs. Don't "feel bad" for it and tell people "It is aggressive because _____." It's aggressive because you refuse to show it a proper way of dealing with situations and you gave up on it.

Also, people should socialize their dogs in packs at a young age to get them used to other dogs and dog social situations. It is very important.
15:21 July 13, 2012 by Vendorune
just don't give them visas to enter the country
15:33 July 13, 2012 by james_g
Of course it's very often - perhaps most often - the owners, but anyone who tries to deny that some dogs are bred to be vicious/aggressive (and that's been going on for a LONG time) has to be a moron with tunnel vision!
16:37 July 13, 2012 by Smartone
Freedom for dogs but imprisonment for humans

What a big joke and bunch of morons who believes there shouldn't be ''leash law''
17:13 July 13, 2012 by strixy
Both Sweden and Norway have an appalling dog ownership culture or shall I say, lack of it. People think dogs are furry people and like people will meet other dogs and 'make friends'. This shows lack of basic knowledge about canines. They may play but more likely play will be the less violent way of establishing rank. Fight is the more violent way and also more likely especially between dogs of the same sex.

People in Scandinavia buy mastiffs and think they are 'gentle giants', so looks like they get their info from yahoo or other not very credible sources. mastiffs were war dogs and they may be soggy with people but it does not apply to ther dogs.

There was a good example of the famous 'verdensmester' mentality in Norway a week ago when a French Mastiff (Dogue de Bordeaux) got free from a yard and attacked a child playing near a kindergarden. Now, Bordeaux do not have a prey drive so probably the owner got the dog and locked it up in the yard with no socialisation. The dog grew up thinking everything outside the fence was an enemy. Indeed, spendid. I have no doubt the sentence will be lenient.

Dogs do not believe in equality but in rank. And whether you like it or not, they are likely to want to establish rank with every dog of the same sex they meet. So stop calling it 'play' when one dog gets on top of another and educate yourself. Not to mention territorial aggression which is also extremely common.
20:14 July 13, 2012 by tadchem
A true Progressive concept...

First pass a law, then teach it to all the dogs in Sweden.

When a dog ignores you, wring your hands, whine, and demand a stronger law.
22:15 July 13, 2012 by OkieFromMuskogee
Hm. This makes me confused. So, if I go to an off-leash dog park, am I supposed to not allow my dog to go up to other dogs unless I have permission from the other owner?

This kinda defeats the purpose of an off-leash park, right?
23:18 July 13, 2012 by fakeempire
If you know your dog is aggressive you shouldn't take it to an off-leash park with other dogs in my opinion. First leash it and see how it behaves with the others (but you can also create your dog to become aggressive sometimes if you have poor connection with your dog) Sometimes a toy or stick will be enough to set off a dog to become aggressive to others.
01:08 July 14, 2012 by strixy
@ OkieFromMuskogee

Exactly. Your dog is to be fully controlable and have a 100% recall. Dog parks are meant for dogs to run free and exercise, not to pester other dogs.

You should call your dog and ask the other owner if they allow their dog to meet yours. If you cannot recall your dog then it should not walk free at all. Period. You can buy a long leash until it's trained.

I have two large dogs, both listen to me under all circumstances. Nevertheless, I do not let them run free in areas where there may be other aggressive and untrained dogs.

@ fakeempire

Every dog can be aggressive under certain circumstances and this is exactly why dog owners should stop being lazy and start practising recall. You do not expect your child to run up to people and steal their ice cream/candy and the same principle applies to dogs.
09:52 July 15, 2012 by Tiny Red Ant
The important issue seems he to be proper training of dogs, not leashing laws.
15:44 July 15, 2012 by Rebel
You know in San Diego coyotes will lure dogs out to play with them and then the pack will swarm down and eat the domestic dog. Now that's dog on dog violence!
19:08 July 15, 2012 by strixy
@ Tiny Red Ant

People in Scandinavia generally do not train the dogs. Their lack the konowledge necessary to do it but are too proud to consult a professional. They may manage to get their dog to perform a trick for a treat but the final and most important lhase of every training, the distraction phase is foreign to them. So their dogs only perform if there is nothing better to do.
17:37 July 16, 2012 by feathernoodle
I'm not understanding this awkwardly written article. Let me see if I have this straight: A guy walks his dog and then ties it up to a pole and leave it there (presumably to go into a shop?) Then, some "unplanned dogs" come along (unplanned in the way that their mothers didn't use birth control or stray dogs that are running lose and owned by no-one) come along and kill the tied up dog. Is that right? This isn't "dog fighting" where people are putting them into a ring and betting money on them, is it?

Are there no "leash laws" in Sweden? Do people not train their dogs how to behave around other dogs? Do they have to have collars & proof of vaccination against rabies on at all times? You have to be very careful when introducing new dogs to one another and they should never be meeting unsupervised.

If people are walking around with their dogs unleashed, especially if they know their dog is aggressive in any way, don't they carry pepper spray or something in case they attack someone/something? Like another dog, a person or a child?

I do know this about Sweden & dog culture....where in NYC (and many other places) you get a HEFTY fine for not picking up after your dog, I have to dodge dog poops all over the sidewalks everywhere, from Malmo to Stockholm. It actually surprised me considering how much Sweden cares about separating their garbage and keeping things tidy.
02:11 July 17, 2012 by strixy

There are leash laws in Scandinavia but they are not enforced in any way. Honestly, I have now a habit of calling the police every time my dogs are attacked by an off leash dog (often) but this has never ever been successful. All I hear from the police officer is 'but isn't it illegal to have a dog off leash in public?'. Then their creativity ends.
13:06 July 17, 2012 by Frank Arbach
I echo the thoughts of others here that not only are there extremely violent dogs in Sweden, which are allowed to roam free - but nothing is being done (that I can see) to control them.

My small dog, Josie, was attacked and killed, on my property (in our garden in fact) by a rottweiler belonging to a local swede woman (her dog burst though the hedge and sadly Josie never had a chance: I couldn't force the rottweiler away with a stick)

This woman eventually called her animal away - and returned later - big smile and said 'My dog might have damaged yours, but never mind I buy you another one'!!

I went to the local police who showed no interest at all - maintaining that it was difficult to prove anything, my-word-against-the woman's (etc) and as the woman had offered to buy another dog that should settle it

Honestly, how would YOU feel..?

My sympathy for Hubbe and his family.
17:05 July 17, 2012 by strixy
@ Frank Arbach

I'm really sorry for your loss. Sadly, this kind of attitude is not uncommon here, it kind of shows how materialistic people here can be.

It's not much different in Norway. A few months ago I was walking my dogs in the centre of Oslo when suddenly a large aggressive pointer mix approached us. One of my dogs was a puppy then (GSD) and you can imagine I was trying my best to protect it from being attacked. So was my other dog but I do not allow my dogs to settle arguments on their own, so I simply kicked off the attacker (the dog grabbed my older dog by his neck and did not intend to let go).

To my dismay the owner ran up to me and grabbed me by the neck! He was about 2m tall and approximately 100kg. Needless to say, he was just standing and smiling when his dog was attacking mine and did NOTHING to stop the attack.

I went to the police station and reported the incident (dog attack plus assault). They were not interested, even though I was in pain from the attack. They told me to write a letter to them and describe the incident. Ha! I did. About 8-10 weeks later a reply arrived: they had closed the case because they could not identify the suspect. The case was classed as 'dog law breach', not a word about the assault!

The funniest thing is that I could and can identify this man (he lives down the road from me) and the police knew it because I told them I met him every day.
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