SHARE
COPY LINK

CRIMINAL

Parents held over genital mutilation

A man and a woman have been remanded into custody by Attunda district court in Sollentuna on suspicion of having subjected their daughter to female genital mutilation (FGM).

The couple who are both in their 30s are suspected of having allowed the procedure to be carried out on their 3-year-old sometime between January and April 2012 in either Sweden or Gambia.

Female genital mutilation has been illegal in Sweden since 1982. Since 1999 it is an offence even if the procedure is performed in a different country and carries a penalty of up to four years imprisonment.

If the offence results in a serious threat of death, such as a serious illness the penalty can be extended to between two and ten years in prison.

During the almost 30 years that FGM has been banned in Sweden, only 46 suspected cases have been reported, according to a report from Uppsala University published last year.

The mutilation is often done on the quiet and is difficult to detect.

Only two people have been convicted for female genital mutilation, and in both cases it was the afflicted girls themselves who raised the alarm.

In 2006 sentenced a 41-year-old man was sentenced to two years in prison for the genital mutilation of his daughter. The then 12-year-old girl was subjected to the procedure sometime in the autumn 2004.

In the second case, the same year, a 42-year-old woman was sentenced to three years in prison for sexual mutilation and gross violation of integrity of her daughter.

During the trial, the girl told of how her mother and two other women held her down while they cut away parts of her genitals.

The assault came to light when she told a school counsellor five years later.

CRIMINAL

Bluff bid for Swedish firm sparks market turmoil

An erroneous press release published on Friday indicating that Swedish firm Fingerprint Cards had been acquired by Samsung led to a sharp rise in the firm's stock and a criminal investigation once the mistake had been discovered.

Bluff bid for Swedish firm sparks market turmoil

“An investigation has shown that the company followed its routines and was subjected to a deliberate fraud attempt,” business wire service Cision, the firm responsible for publishing the press release, said in a statement on Friday.

Fingerprint Cards, a Gothenburg-based biometric technology firm, issued a denial on its homepage on Friday that it had been acquired by the Korean electronics giant.

“The news in today’s media that Fingerprint Cards AB has been acquired by Samsung is incorrect… What has happened will be reported to the police and to the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority,” the firm wrote.

The matter is now being handled by the Swedish Economic Crimes Authority (Ekobrottsmyndigheten) which has opened a preliminary investigation into aggravated fraud.

Trading in the company’s stock was halted as soon as the abnormal share fluctuations were detected on Friday morning and all trades completed between 10.17am and 10.34 have been nullified.

Fingerprint Cards’ stock has been one of the Stockholm exchange’s strongest performers since the turn of the year, having climbed over 320 percent since January 1st.

The latest Apple Iphone incorporates the firm’s fingerprint sensor.

All trades from 10.17am have also been nullified in sector colleague Precise Biometrics, which also climbed steeply on Friday.

The Local/pvs

Follow The Local on Twitter

SHOW COMMENTS