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Unemployment numbers on the rise in Sweden

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Unemployment numbers on the rise in Sweden
08:57 CEST+02:00
There were more unemployed people and fewer new available jobs in August this year than the same time last year, according to new figures from Sweden's National Public Employment Agency (Arbetsförmedlingen).

This August, 289,000 people, or some 8.4 percent of the workforce, were officially unemployed, 19,000 more than the figure from the same time last year.

This figure marks a 0.2 percentage point increase when compared with August last year.

The number of available jobs officially posted through the country's employment agency sat at 50,000 – a figure 4,000 fewer than at the same time in 2011.

August figures also show that the number of unemployed people was increasing in line with a growing number of redundancy notices.

According to the agency, there were 4,200 people who were given redundancy notices in August, compared with 2,600 a year earlier.

"Most redundancy notices were now in the manufacturing industry directed at 1,200 people. Among counties, Skåne was hit the hardest, with 800 people getting redundancy notices," said the agency in a statement, according to the TT news agency.

Youth unemployment is also on the rise. Overall, 99,000 young people aged 18-24 were registered as unemployed in August this year, an increase of 9,000 compared to a year earlier.

Of these, 53,000 were neither in work nor in a government unemployment programme, 3,000 more than a year ago.

TT/The Local/og

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