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Systembolaget to launch home delivery

The Local · 16 Sep 2012, 11:18

Published: 16 Sep 2012 11:18 GMT+02:00

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The Swedish government has agreed to allow Systembolaget to deliver to homes in six locations across Sweden on a trial basis.

"In the trial we want to explore whether home delivery is possible while maintaining the regulatory framework which Systembolaget has today," said Minister for Children and the Elderly Maria Larsson.

"We want to see if it can be done in a responsible manner without contributing to increased consumption," Larsson said.

Systembolaget's CEO Magdalena Gerger explained that the move was in response to the increasing popularity of internet retail.

"We have witnessd a change in purchasing habits. To order via the internet and then collect in store has almost taken over. We are now simplifying and improving it further for the customer," Gerger said.

To ensure that the legal minimum drinking age is observed the home delivery service will operate a three stage check.

Firstly prospective customers will be required to open an account, approve conditions of service and divulge their personal identification number.

Secondly the buyer must produce a valid ID when receiving the goods; and thirdly the ID will be scanned by Systembolaget's employee.

The home delivery option is set to be launched within a couple of days and will be charged at what Systembolaget claims to be cost price - around 250 kronor ($38) per delivery.

Despite the added convenience, Magdalena Greger does not believe that home delivery will contribute to an increase in alcohol consumption.

"One orders at home instead of going to the store, one doesn't do both. But it is a new trial and that is why we have drafted in researchers who will evaluate it," she said.

Meanwhile the government stated that it doesn't intend to allow the sale of alcoholic beverages directly from farms and vineyards.

"The consultation bodies, not least the legal ones, have been critical and say that it is difficult to reconcile with the retail monopoly," Maria Larsson said.

But the issue is set to remain under consideration at the Government Offices.

Story continues below…

"We will analyze the issue one more time, we explore all the avenues to see if there is a way forward," she said, pointing out that the Alliance coalition parties consider it to be a good idea.

"But we are not prepared to do so in a way that risks the Systembolaget."

TT/The Local/pvs

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Your comments about this article

13:09 September 16, 2012 by markusd
So in the interest of customer service, they will offer home delivery at a price that is equivalent of one to three bottles of wine but they still won't open on Sunday.

I'll have to remember to thank them for thinking of me the next time I'm rushing through their store at 2:30 on Saturday, preparing for the next day's dinner.
13:23 September 16, 2012 by StockholmSam
" 'We want to see if it can be done in a responsible manner without contributing to increased consumption,' Larsson said."

Right. Looking for better ways to reach your market while trying to avoid an increase of your product's consumption makes no sense whatsoever. The whole point here is to increase consumption. If they wanted to decrease consumption, a better strategy would be to open later, close earlier, increase prices and decrease selection. Making it more convenient to get the product via home delivery is NOT the best strategy to decrease consumption. I think somebody is very confused.
14:05 September 16, 2012 by Children Of Adam
We need to hire more Police officers to catch out related crimes to alchol delivery.

I thought banning smoking and alcohol can help society at the good level to live peaceful and healthy. But what government needs is your money and tax, and ask you to drink more and fall down on train stations.
14:15 September 16, 2012 by skogsbo
Markusd, if you don't feel able to plan your drug consumption 24hrs in advance then perhaps that's a sign to cut back? ;)
14:29 September 16, 2012 by 160kph
To make using home delivery cost worthy with the 250kr delivery charge you will have to buy quite a lot of alcohol. No one will get a couple of beers and a bottle of wine delivered, you will need to buy a few cases of beer or boxes of wine for it to make sense.

Isn't that going to increase peoples consumption as you'll have more alcohol in the house
15:22 September 16, 2012 by Hauhr
@skogsbo, I cannot tell you just how sick I am of that tired old argument. So you are telling me that if @Markusd gets a call from his mother at lunchtime on Saturday to tell him he's getting 5 five guests over for sunday dinner, it's fine that he has no fillet steak, potatoes, gravy etc at home, and has to make an unplanned trip to Ica. But since he wants to serve a glass of Chianti with the food and therefore also makes a very stressed visit to Systembolaget before their ridiculous closing time on Saturday, this is a sign that he needs to cut back on alcohol generally?
15:26 September 16, 2012 by Abe L
I greatly encourage this. First off the stores have horrible opening hours, while staying at home for a day to receive a delivery isn't a problem. Second, I no longer have to make my way through gypsies, alcoholic homeless people and other chavs to purchase alcoholic beverages.

The delivery fee is a bit on the high end and I don't understand why ID needs to be scanned. The delivery guy could simply see if it's valid. As long as we still live in a society where everything that gets scanned then gets saved and recorded, I'm not to pleased with that. If you purchase alcohol at one of their regular stores you just need to show it. Aside from that, how are they going to scan international IDs or passports without barcodes?
16:04 September 16, 2012 by Grokh
its never been so easy to be an alcoholic /facepalm
17:00 September 16, 2012 by skogsbo
Hauhr , first he should tell his mother, that he invites people to his home, not her.

Next he simply keeps a very small stash of bottles, say 5 or 6, simple, you never run out and since when has buying booze ever been stressful, the system is far more civilised than ANY Ica store. You make it sound like the ability to buy alcohol 24/7 is part of your human rights!
23:48 September 16, 2012 by Hisingen
Skogsbo, maybe not 24/7. but 10/7 perhaps. Rather like the wine & spirit merchants in the UK. As to having something in reserve, sure, not a problem surely, but there is always the unexpected that is not catered for in Sweden, no matter what. You never know what you least expect most :-) . . .
06:33 September 17, 2012 by TJSmith
The whole idea of Systembolaget is the real problem. Government explaining how they want responsible adults to drink, when and how much to pay for services.
07:48 September 17, 2012 by skogsbo
TJ, I don't think they tell you when and how much to drink? Only when you can purchase it? Like most stores in Sweden they don't open 24hrs, or even 15hrs everyday. Which is great. What about those people who will have to work in the stores. Sweden s great because it doesn't have the 24/7 I must be able to shop culture, that forces many workers to never spend time off with their family's.

His, and look the alcohol problem in the UK, in homes and on the streets, it's a point in case that it isn't the way you would like it to go.

I just completely fail to see what is beyond most people keeping a few bottles at home, we put food in the freeer by planning ahead, we don't put fuel in our cars for each individual journey, you don't go to the cash point every morning for the days money, what is so hard about not buying your daily alcohol requirement 24hrs ahead of when you need it? :) I live 40km from the nearest system and I'm from the UK drinking culture and I seem to get by!

The only people who can't keep booze in the house without touching it, are alcoholics, hence why you see them sitting on a bench out the system at 945 everyday in city centres and also why the state decided to limit the hours of sale. The regulations just can't harm a responsible drinker?
08:01 September 17, 2012 by RobinHood
This is irrelevant to all except the rich.

Only the rich have an additional 250 SEK to pay, on top of what is already overpriced (by European standards) alcohol.
08:13 September 17, 2012 by skogsbo
I can buy a 500ml bottle of UK real ale for 19-20kr in the system, at 10.5kr/£, that's £1.81. which I would say represents pretty good value for an imported beer, that probably doesn't sel much volume.

There are advantages to a state run monopoly, in that they can't and don't just sell certainly lines for a profit margin, they can't just sell certain brands of beer, certain nation's wine etc. which gives the consumer a wider choice. Tescos in the UK buys more alcohol than the system alone, so the system will never be cheaper because it simply doesn't have the buying power, but I bet the system sell more different types of beer from more nations than Tescos.
08:40 September 17, 2012 by 160kph

Are you saying that we need to keep a stockpile of everything we might fancy at home just in case?

I quite often go weeks without the desire to drink alcohol. But I sometimes fancy a beer or cider or a few glasses of red or white wine normally on a weekend evening. I hate the feeling of pressure to get to the Systembolaget before it closes on the weekend. The restrictive times that Systembolaget open make people more obsessed with making sure they have Alcohol for the weekend.

When I lived in Britain I never worried about planning to get to the shop on time. I'm not talking 24/7 opening hours but reasonable times suitable for normal people. I see no reason why you can't sell beer and wine in supermarkets that are going to be open anyway so aren't going to be keeping people away from there families any more then they do now. It seems to work in all the other Scandinavian countries that I've been to.
08:55 September 17, 2012 by cogito
@TjSmith (#11). #1

Yes, the Swedish state is the real real villain. Systemet adds insult to injury by treating us as though we are all irresponsible drunks or not-too-bright children.

But then the Swedish state (Big Mother) treats its citizens like children in most ways.
09:00 September 17, 2012 by skogsbo
160kph, you need to consider the shelf life for anything you want to drink is much longer than anything you put in the freezer, what problem is having small stock going to cause? 2 bottles of red, 2 white, 2 rose, some lager, cider and some beer. 400-1000kr, hardly going to harm storing just that? Then next time you are passing the system, you just top up at your leisure, there is no rushed panic buying, you simply have a roam around and see what you like the look of and add it to your stash?

If the system was private, the state would still want it's share of tax, but you would now have a middleman, the private store wanting a big profit. Narrow lines that don't shift will disappear from the shelfs straight away. Major lines will cost more, as supermarkets take their share of profit. If the private store can't negotiate a bulk discount with say a Czech beer from a germany supplier, then it just won't it anymore etc.

You can survive a day without alcohol? you just plan ahead ever so slightly, just like you do when you food shop. Unless of course you food shop ever single day?
09:34 September 17, 2012 by 160kph
My point is Skogbo that I don't want to have to plan ahead just to buy a beer. If I fancy a Mars bar or a packet of crisps I'll pop into my local Ica, not drive 20km to a city centre that I have no other reason to go to. This planning to get to the Systembolaget makes people more obsessed with alcohol in my opinion.

I don't feel that I should have to stockpile things just because I might fancy them weeks/months in the future.

I'm not saying that I want to do away with the Systembolaget just that some of there policies such as opening hours and only letting supermarkets sell watered down beer are annoying and a little unnecessary.

I like the fact that there is such a good choice of interesting beers and wines and as alcohol is a luxury I see no problem with there prices, it's just no fun looking at them through the shop window at 3.15 on a Saturday afternoon.
14:07 September 17, 2012 by B Slick
Could this be the first step towards the swedish goverment releasing its "death grip" over the sale of alcohol in sweden? Beer and Wine could be sold at regular markets and liquor stores without any problem.
22:05 September 17, 2012 by mvp123
"we want to keep alcohol consumption down " what a joke !! When will the government stop treating swedes like kids. We can make our own decisions and dont need politicians telling us how much to drink if we choose to !! look at germany , denmark , and a handful of other countries do they have a consumption problem? They are making billions of crowns sucking the poor swedish people dry ! time to put a end to it and privatize liquor stores !!
09:11 September 18, 2012 by cogito
"we want to keep alcohol consumption down "

What cynical hypocrisy. Does anyone believe this?

For anyone who does, here's the news: It's about the revenue, stupid. The more alcohol Swedes consume, the better to fund their "business" trips to France.
19:28 September 18, 2012 by cattie
I think they want to keep their alcoholic customers out of sight and off the torget, Plus, the plans may be to reduce the number of retail locations (like Posten) and therefore are prepping the regular customers,
10:50 September 19, 2012 by Swedish Cat
Systembolaget is the most stupid thing ever and if you come home from living abroad you see it clear. The best thing is that people are defending it in Sweden. The worst thing that can happen for systembolaget is that people cut down on alcohol consumption though crazy money involved for government. The government is alloud to then do what all other companies cant "monopoly". They say it is dangerous but government is then selling alcohol, gambling etc as to dangerous for the public?? So many Swedes are living abroad being able to access alcohol in supermarkets without being alcoholics. I love the fact that it is 18 to drink in a pub but 20 to cary home booze. The logic is that the pub is a safer environment than your home lol. The freedom for adults being able to bring a bottle of wine if they are going to a spontaneous dinner party as a gift or that you might want a bottle of wine with your dinner in the supermarket, I never bought a bag in box living in the UK but now me and all my friends are having one standing...
10:26 October 1, 2012 by Ale Komvux
I think that Maria Larsson is a bit confused she says that they want to try to allow systembolaget to do home delivery. And she says "without contributing to increased consumption". But systembolaget is charging around 250kr for the home delivery. I think that those who will order from the internet is going to order a lot of alcohol so that will be worth those 250kr. Isn't that increased consumption?
18:27 October 2, 2012 by oddsock
After work on Friday I pass Systemet on my walk home and buy as much booze as possible for the weekend. Because I know I can't get any in the shops near my house and a decent drink in a pub costs 60+ SEK.

As a result, my drinking has greatly increased since I came to Sweden.
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