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SAS

Man faked bomb threat after missing flight

A man has been charged with raising false alarm after faking a bomb threat in order to prevent a Malta-bound Scandinavian Arlines flight from taking off without him.

Man faked bomb threat after missing flight

The already delayed plane was just about to depart when a 41-year-old man from Gävle in central Sweden reportedly came running towards the gate, shouting “I’m getting on that plane!”

When a Scandinavian Airlines staff member told the man that it was too late to board, he said, repeatedly, that there was a bomb on the plane.

The pilot was told to stop the plane and police were called.

While waiting for the police to arrive, the man threatened to call the Aftonbladet newspaper to tell them there was a bomb on board an SAS plane and that he was not being allowed to catch his flight.

The man’s breath apparently smelled of alcohol.

Asked by the police whether he realized the seriousness of issuing a bomb scare, the man replied that him not being allowed on the plane was just as serious.

When the police told him he would not be travelling, the 41-year-old pointed at the plane, which was returning to the gate, and said that he would be getting on it.

“It’s coming back so I can go,” he said.

But instead of holidaying in Malta the man got to travel to a police detention centre in Stockholm.

During questioning he said that he was a diabetic and was not quite sure what he was talking about.

The plane was evacuated and searched and the passengers were transferred on to a different plane before finally leaving for Malta over two hours late.

Nine passengers missed their connecting flights as a result and had to spend the night in a hotel.

One passenger was treated by medical personnel after experiencing breathing difficulties.

SAS has demanded that the 41-year-old pay the airline 100,000 kronor ($15,000) in damages.

The Local/nr

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SAS

SAS announces reduced loss and pins hopes on summer flights

Scandinavian airline SAS narrowed its losses in the second quarter, the company said Thursday, as it set its hopes on an easing of coronavirus restrictions this summer.

SAS announces reduced loss and pins hopes on summer flights
A SAS aircraft taking off in Paris. Photo: Charles Platiau/Reuters/Ritzau Scanpix

The earnings report came a day after the governments of Sweden and Denmark announced another round of aid to the ailing carrier.

From February to April, SAS booked a net loss of 2.43 billion Swedish kronor ($292 million, 240 million euros) — 30 percent smaller than in the second quarter last year.

The company also reported an improved operating profit “for the first time since the pandemic’s outbreak, both year-on-year and compared with the previous quarter,” pointing to its cost cutting efforts.

However, the number of passengers in the period declined by 140,000 compared to the first quarter, to 857,000.

This caused revenue to fall to 1.93 billion kronor, a 15 percent drop from the preceding quarter and 63 percent from a year earlier.

“The increase in vaccination rates provides some hope for the relaxation of restrictions, and an increase in demand ahead of the important summer season,” chief executive Karl Sandlund said in a statement.

However, the CEO also noted that “many customers are now increasingly choosing to book their tickets much closer to their travel dates, which makes it difficult to predict demand during the summer.”

SAS also said it expected claims from passengers of up to 150 million kronor after a European court ruled in March that customers should be compensated over disruptions due to a pilots’ strike in 2019.

After cutting 5,000 jobs last year — representing 40 percent of its workforce — SAS announced Wednesday an additional credit line of three billion kronor from the Danish and Swedish governments, its main shareholders, to get through the crisis.

The airline received a similar loan and a capital increase last year.

READ ALSO: Virus-stricken airline SAS secures new public loan from Denmark and Sweden

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