• Sweden's news in English

Volvo aims for 'no-death' new cars by 2020

4 Dec 2012, 07:24

Published: 04 Dec 2012 07:24 GMT+01:00

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

Volvo, which is owned by China's Geely group, is currently developing cars that drive themselves and plans to launch a first model in 2014 that can drive at 50 kilometres per hour.

"Our vision is that no one is killed or injured in a new Volvo by 2020," Anders Eugensson, Volvo's head of government affairs, told the Wall Street Journal.

According to the newspaper, Volvo has tested the prototypes on "thousands of miles of test drives on public roads in Spain and on the company's test track in western Sweden."

"The car of the future will be just like the farmer's horse. The farmer can steer the horse and carriage but if he falls asleep the horse can still (get) back home. And if the farmer tries to steer the carriage against a tree or off a cliff, the horse will refuse," Eugensson said.

Volvo refused to comment on how much they were investing in the project.

The news came as the company announced its total investments for the period 2011-2015 would amount to $11 billion of which a third would go toward the renovation and expansion of its facilities in Sweden.

An undisclosed sum would also go toward developing a new, more fuel-efficient four cylinder engine.

US internet search engine Google has also been testing its own prototype of a self-driving car since 2010.

Story continues below…

Volvo Car Corporation is a separate entity from the Volvo Group, the maker of trucks, buses and construction machinery, since the auto company was sold to Ford in 1999. It was sold to Geely in 2010.

AFP/The Local

Follow The Local on Twitter

Facebook Twitter Google+ reddit

Your comments about this article

08:57 December 4, 2012 by smilingjack
we have seen speed limits wiped in australia. 100kph zones became 90 then 80 and then 70.

for a country with virtually no rail and vast distances to be covered its absurd.

I can see the only way these claims can be made is with a magnetic type buffer zone enforced around all vehicles and speed capped. something like minority report. the way of the future
13:03 December 4, 2012 by EtoileBrilliant
"Our vision is that no one is killed or injured in a new Volvo by 2020"

Small detail but what about third parties OUTSIDE your new Volvo. Therein lies the problem, as passenger related deaths fall, so they are offset by the rise in deaths in other road users such as pedestrians, cyclists, and god forbid, other motorists.

Today's car designers cocoon drivers from the real risks by sound proofing and adding extra safety features leading drivers to believe they can push the limit more and more.

What is needed in-built limiters that cut the speed of drivers/log and report infringements.
00:56 December 5, 2012 by jmclewis
How can Darwinism work?
02:20 December 5, 2012 by Ian C. Purdie - Sydney
A laudible goal for Volvo, I hope they attain it. Nice car. Over priced in Australia.


I'm unaware of roads between vast distances having reduced speed limits. Urban areas yes and correctly so.
23:00 December 7, 2012 by tomas R

It is very good and practical idea! All systems are important in the car. I mean engine (the heart of the car), fuel and injection system, ignition system, steering, brakes, suspension and so on. But I personally think that SAFETY (of people sitting inside the car) is number one.

I had the road accident on 2010.12.06 (two years ago). I went out from the main road and stoped when I crashed my car (the other swedish car SAAB 9000'95) to the small concrete wall where water flows. It was a lot of snow on the road. I had the small shock after that accident but I was whole (without damages).

So I replaced my front bumper, front lights (the turning lights were ok) and some plastic parts. The hood of the SAAB was without damages. I drove slowly my car home after that road accident. So I drive this swedish car from 2006.08.09 till these days. I am proud of driving SAAB but I like VOLVO too.

So I wish the best success to VOLVO's safety engineers!


(Tomas Racys from Lithuania)
Today's headlines
Refugee crisis
Asylum requests in Sweden down by 70 percent
Sweden's migration minister Morgan Johansson. Photo: Christine Olsson/TT

Sweden received 70 percent fewer requests for asylum in the period between January and September 2016 than it did during the same time last year, the country’s justice and migration minister Morgan Johansson has revealed.

The unique story of Stockholm's floating libraries
The Stockholm archipelago book boat. Photo: Roger Hill.

Writer Roger Hill details his journeys on the boats that carry books over Stockholm's waterways and to its most remote places.

Refugee crisis
Second Stockholm asylum centre fire in a week
The new incident follows a similar fire in Fagersjö last week (pictured). Photo: Johan Nilsson/TT

Police suspect arson in the blaze, as well as a similar incident which occurred last Sunday.

More misery for Ericsson as losses pile up
Ericsson interim CEO Jan Frykhammar presenting its third quarter results. Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT

The bad news just keeps coming from the Swedish telecoms giant.

Facebook 'sorry' for removing Swedish cancer video
A computer displaying Facebook's landing page. Photo: Christine Olsson/TT

The social media giant had censored a video explaining how women should check for suspicious lumps in their breasts.

Watch this amazing footage of Sweden’s landscapes
A still from the aerial footage of Sweden. Photo: Nate Summer-Cook

The spectacular drone footage captures both Sweden's south and the opposite extreme, thousands of kilometres north.

Sweden could be allowed to keep border controls: EU
Police ID checks at Hyllie station in southern Sweden. Photo: Stig-Åke Jönsson/TT

Sweden could be allowed to keep ID controls on its border with Denmark beyond the current end date of November, following discussions among EU leaders in Brussels last night.

Why women in Sweden will work for free by November
File photo of a woman working in a Swedish office. Photo: Anders Willund/TT

A new study into the gender pay gap suggests Sweden still has some work to do.

Look familiar? Meet your jawbone's ancestor
Thank God for evolution, eh?

There's something fishy about the human jawbone – it has its origins in the placodermi, a jowly species of fish that lived 400 million years ago, Swedish and Chinese researchers say.

Isis claims unremarked arson attack in Malmö
The arson attack took place on Norra Grängesbergsgatan in Malmö. File photo: Emil Langvad/TT

An arson attack in Malmö that caused only minor damage and was barely reported in the media has been claimed by terror group Isis.

Sponsored Article
This is Malmö: Football capital of Sweden
Fury at plans that 'threaten the IB's survival' in Sweden
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
Here's where it could snow in central Sweden this weekend
Analysis & Opinion
Are we just going to let half the country die?
Blog updates

6 October

10 useful hjälpverb (The Swedish Teacher) »

"Hej! I think the so-called “hjalpverb” (auxiliary verbs in English) are a good way to get…" READ »


8 July

Editor’s blog, July 8th (The Local Sweden) »

"Hej readers, It has, as always, been a bizarre, serious and hilarious week in Sweden. You…" READ »

Sponsored Article
7 reasons you should join Sweden's 'a-kassa'
Angry elk chases Swede up a lamp post
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
The Local Voices
'Alienation in Sweden feels better: I find myself a stranger among scores of aliens'
People-watching: October 20th
The Local Voices
A layover at Qatar airport brought this Swedish-Kenyan couple together - now they're heading for marriage
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Swede punches clown that scared his grandmother
Sponsored Article
Swedish for programmers: 'It changed my life'
Fans throw flares and enter pitch in Swedish football riot
Could Swedish blood test solve 'Making a Murderer'?
Sponsored Article
Top 7 tips to help you learn Swedish
Property of the week: Linnéstaden, Gothenburg
Sponsored Article
How to vote absentee from abroad in the US elections
Swedish school to build gender neutral changing room
People-watching: October 14th-16th
Sponsored Article
'There was no future for me in Turkey'
Man in Sweden assaulted by clowns with broken bottle
Sponsored Article
‘Extremism can't be defeated on the battlefield alone’
Nobel Prize 2016: Literature
Sponsored Article
Stockholm: creating solutions to global challenges
Watch the man who discovered Bob Dylan react to his Nobel Prize win
Sponsored Article
Why you should 'grab a chair' on Stockholm's tech scene
Record numbers emigrating from Sweden
Sponsored Article
'There was no future for me in Turkey'
People-watching: October 12th
Sponsored Article
Where is the Swedish music industry heading?
The Local Voices
'Swedish startups should embrace newcomers' talents - there's nothing to fear'
Sponsored Article
Last chance to vote absentee in the US elections
How far right are the Sweden Democrats?
Property of the week: Triangeln, Malmö
Sweden unveils Europe's first elk hut
People-watching: October 7th-9th
The Local Voices
Syria's White Helmets: The Nobel Peace Prize would have meant a lot, but pulling a child from rubble is the greatest reward
Missing rune stone turns up in Sweden
Nobel Prize 2016: Chemistry
jobs available