Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Retrial in 'missing Marina' murder case

Share this article

Retrial in 'missing Marina' murder case
10:12 CET+01:00
Sweden's Supreme Court is set to tackle the murder case of a woman whose body was found two years after she was reported missing. The woman's ex-boyfriend will now stand trial for the first time since the body has been found.

The murdered woman, Marina Johansson,  was last seen alive in July, 2010. Her ex-boyfriend was arrested soon after, even though there were no indications that the woman was dead, and nothing incriminating had been found by police at the woman's house. Five months later, people moving into her house found a blood-soaked mattress and a bullet in the wall.

It wasn't until almost two years later that the body of the 31-year-old Johansson was found hidden inside another mattress in the woods, discovered by volunteer search organization Missing People. The mattress was hollowed out to make room for the body, and partially concealed by large pieces of wood. Johansson's identity was confirmed through her dental records.

SEE ALSO: A complete timeline of the Marina Johansson murder case

Her ex-boyfriend, who had been arrested, tried, and acquitted twice since her disappearance, will be arrested once more and detained ahead of the new Supreme Court trial.

"The Supreme Court has concluded that it remains uncertain that the ex-boyfriend would have been convicted in accordance with the indictment if the new evidence had have been known at the time of the trial," the court wrote in a statement released on Friday.

Head prosecutor Urban Svenkvist told the TT news agency that he thinks the "chances are good" that the man will be convicted for Johansson's murder.

TT/The Local/og

twitter.com/thelocalsweden

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The power of cooperation: the secret to Swedish success?

Is the Swedish approach to leadership really as special as people think? The Local asks a non-Swedish manager at telecom giant Ericsson for a frank appraisal of Swedes' so-called 'lagom' leadership style.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement