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Most new jobs in Sweden go to immigrants

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Most new jobs in Sweden go to immigrants
07:49 CET+01:00
Roughly 70 percent of the more than 200,000 jobs created in Sweden since 2006 have gone to residents born abroad, new statistics show.
Since 2006, when the current centre-right government took power, around 230,000 new jobs have been created in Sweden, according to figures from Statistics Sweden (SCB).
 
The figures reveal further that 160,000 of the newly created jobs have gone to people born outside of Sweden.
 
Speaking with Sveriges Radio (SR) about the statistics, Integration Minister Erik Ullenhag added that at 100,000 of the new jobs went to workers born outside of Europe.
 
"We've had a very positive development when it comes to immigrants in the Swedish labour market in that we've never had so many people that were born other counties that actually go to work," he told the broadcaster.
 
Despite the improvements, the overall employment rate among immigrants is lower than the rate among workers born in Sweden.
 
Ullenhag emphasized the figures show that government has succeeded in reaching groups that "were farthest away from the labour market".
 
He added, however, that the "biggest challenge" of youth employment remains.
 
"We have a goal for the government of full employment and it's clear we have more to do," he told SR.
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