Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Swedish parents fuming over toy knuckledusters

Share this article

Swedish parents fuming over toy knuckledusters
Parents are upset over these knuckledusters. Screenshot: BR Leksaker
10:42 CET+01:00
Parents in Sweden are fighting mad over a set of knuckledusters marketed to children in a Christmas toy catalogue that boasts the faux weapon is "perfect for a pretend fist-fight".
Among the hundreds of playthings featured in the annual Christmas catalogue distributed by Swedish toy retailer BR Leksaker is a set of toy knuckledusters, also known as brass-knuckles.
 
And a number of parents are none too happy about it.
 
"I'm totally outraged. It's the description that gets me, that it's perfect for pretend fist-fights – it's sick," parent Vicky Wallin told the Aftonbladet newspaper.
 
Another parent, Martina Karlsson, questioned whether the toy, which features plush spikes for "increased range" should even be called a toy.
 
"Knuckledusters are really only for fighting," she told the paper.
 
"I'm never going to shop at BR Leksaker again."
 
A spokeswoman for Top Toy, that Danish firm that owns BR Leksaker, seemed unaware that the knuckledusters were available for purchase on the Swedish toy store's website.
 
"I didn't know that we had this. I not aware of all the weapons we have," Top Toy's Anne Dorte Jörgensen told Aftonbladet.
 
"I'm not sure of the reason we're selling this."
 
With a list price of 59.90 kronor ($9), the plush knuckledusters are made of foam, but have a finish that makes them appear like they are made of metal.
 
They are recommended for children that are eight-years-old and up.
 
This isn't the first time Top Toy's catalogue has generated controversy in Sweden. Last year, the distributed a "gender neutral" catalogue picturing boys holding baby dolls and banishing girls from the dolls pages.
 
The move, while generally welcomed in Sweden, generated headlines abroad, including criticism from observers in the UK who called the decision "bizarre".
 
Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The power of cooperation: the secret to Swedish success?

Is the Swedish approach to leadership really as special as people think? The Local asks a non-Swedish manager at telecom giant Ericsson for a frank appraisal of Swedes' so-called 'lagom' leadership style.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement