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Cops finger wild boar in cyclist's mystery death

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Cops finger wild boar in cyclist's mystery death
Photo: Hasse Holmberg/TT
15:38 CET+01:00
A wild boar may have caused the death of a Swedish man who was found with such extensive injuries that the police initially thought he had been murdered.
 
The man, 70, was found seriously injured last week beside his bicycle just outside Dalarö, southeast of Stockholm. He died two days later. 
 
The extent of the man's injuries were so severe that a doctor claimed they could never have been caused by a cycling accident. Police initially suspected murder, but an investigation seemed to indicate that it wasn't another person behind the incident, rather, a wild boar. 
 
"We're 100 percent certain that this is a tragic accident where the man's dog was tied to the bike's handlebars and then it suddenly pulled away down a hill. I have seen steep hills, but this one is insanely steep," Lembit Vilidu of the Södertörn police told the Mitti newspaper. 
 
And police think nearby boar caused the dog to react so strongly. 
 
"When one of the witnesses came to the scene, there was a wild hog at the edge of the forest," he said, adding that there were almost 30 boars in the vicinity the day before. "There is an assumption, and this is what we're going with now, that a wild boar contributed to the accident."
 
The deceased man was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. Police said that while a helmet may have saved the cyclist, he would not have escaped without serious injuries.
 
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