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Ikea recalls kids' items over strangulation fears

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Ikea recalls kids' items over strangulation fears
Some of the canopies in question. Photo: Ikea
09:11 CET+01:00
Swedish budget furniture maker Ikea has recalled almost 3 million canopies used for a children's bed, citing fears their design might put kids at risk of being strangled.

On Thursday, Ikea Sweden released a statement asking that customers stop using several products for infants and small children.

Citing "valuable feedback from customers," Ikea said children could pull the canopies down and get entangled in the fabric.

"We have had some reports of young children getting entangled in these canopies," Ikea spokeswoman Ylva Magnusson said, adding that some children had sustained minor injuries.

The product names are:

Legendarisk
Minnen
Barnslig boll
Minnen Brodyr
Himmel
Fabler
Tissla
Klammig

The canopies in question have been sold at all of Ikea's warehouses around the world since 1996.

The company asked customers who have bought the canopies -- which look like mosquito nets draped over a cot or child's bed -- to stop using them and return them to Ikea stores around the world for a full refund.

"We apologize for any possible inconvenience this may cause, but safety is always the highest priority for Ikea," the company added in a statement.

Ikea gave no explanation as to why the products were on the market for so long before a recall was deemed necessary.

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