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Malmö Nazi attack victim on the mend

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Malmö Nazi attack victim on the mend
Showan Shattak pictured in Malmö before his attack. Photo: Facebook
09:55 CEST+02:00
The 25-year-old man, whose stabbing by neo-Nazis sparked mass demonstrations across Sweden, has made a strong recovery in hospital and took to social media to thank supporters for campaigning against fascism.

Showan Shattak, a well-known fan of Malmö football club, was stabbed in his native city on March 8th after attending a demonstration in support of International Women's Day. 

"After six weeks on the neurological department and four surgeries, my intensive care ended. I have now been transferred to an open hospital where I'm at with better conditions," Shattak posted on Facebook.

The supporter, who has worked to stamp out homophobia in football, was the most seriously injured of the six people who were attacked.

In the wake of the incident The Party of the Swedes (Svenskarnas Parti - SvP) subsequently issued a statement where they appeared to take responsibility.

News of the attack sparked revulsion across Sweden, in particular in Shattak's hometown of Malmö. A week after he was left fighting for his life more than 10,000 locals demonstrated against fascism, while similar rallies were held across the country.

"Don't know what I would have done without all the help and sympathy that I and my family have received recently. The road is punctuated by massive solidarity greetings from friends, comrades, football fans and particularly MFF family.The heat in your action and anti-fascism gives me strength," he wrote on Facebook.

Don't Miss: 'History is repeating itself': Malmö on Nazism

Shattak was left in a coma after being set upon by a group of neo-Nazis in the popular Möllevångstorget area of the city.

Swedish police arrested three men, with ties to The Party of the Swedes, in connection with the incident in a case that also involved Interpol.

The image of Shattak has become a familiar sight in the southern Swedish city with posters and t-shirts bearing the slogan 'Kämpa Showan' (Fight Showan) spreading like wildfire across town.

Shattak added that he was due to have a final operation on his skull at the Lund University Hospital, and was looking forward to resuming a normal life when he was discharged. 

The Local/pr

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