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Sweden set for darkest November on record

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Sweden set for darkest November on record
The sun. File photo: TT
17:52 CET+01:00
Many Swedes spend November wondering where the sun has gone and this year has been greyer than usual with the month promising to be the darkest on record in some parts of the country.

A thick blanket of cloud has been parked over most of central and southern Sweden on Sunday, pretty much where it has been since the month began, according to new statistics from the SMHI meteorological agency.

Only in the far north, around Kiruna, has the sun been able to break through the clouds on a regular basis this November and forecasts indicate that the status quo is set to last.

So that November feeling when Swedes start to think 'perhaps Christmas on a beach might not be such a bad idea this year as well' has support in the research with for example Växjö in southern Sweden only having seen the sun for a total of one hour so far.

Stockholm is meanwhile not far ahead with a measly two hours of sunlight to show for 16 days of November grey. Borlänge in central Sweden has managed to scrape together a whopping three hours.

Kiruna however is bucking the trend with 36 sunlight hours, only four off the November record of 40.

"It depends on whether the cloud cover breaks up a little in the rest of the month," said Alexandra Ohlsson at SMHI.

And unless things brighten south of the Arctic Circle, much of the country could set a new record low.

"We have a number of stations in southern Sweden which are lying below record lows at the moment," Ohlsson said.

Ohlsson urged Swedes to keep an eye on the skies and encouraged them to grab the opportunity if, against all the odds, the clouds do actually crack just a little and let the sun shine through.

"Although my advice would really be: take a trip to the sun," she said.

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