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Nobel winners feast at Stockholm dinner

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Nobel winners feast at Stockholm dinner
Photo:TT
07:38 CET+01:00
After picking up their awards in the Swedish capital on Wednesday afternoon, the Nobel Prize winners for 2014 joined Sweden's royal family for an evening dinner followed by dancing.

More than a thousand guests were invited to the Nobel banquet in Stockholm’s City Hall, which took place as biting winds surrounded the city.

But the diners warmed up with a feast which included cauliflower soup, deer and sorbet.

Chef Klas Lindberg, who was responsible for the food, told news agency TT he had focused on selecting a “heart appetiser”. The entire meal took four days to make, with 43 chefs involved in the process.

Sweden’s royal family members were out in force at the event. Princess Madeleine was joined by her New York banker husband Christopher O’Neill. Her brother Prince Carl Philip brought along his fiance Sofia Hellqvist who is a former reality TV personality in Sweden.

IN PICTURES: The 2014 Nobel Banquet

Prime Minister Stefan Löfven avoided sitting next to any rival politicians, after calling a snap election last week because he failed to get enough support for his budget.

Flowers were reportedly flown in from San Remo in Italy, where Alfred Nobel died in 1896. The Swedish chemist laid the foundations for the Nobel Prizes in his will.

The winners of the 2014 Nobel Prizes included French author Patrick Modiano who scooped the Literature award and Japanese scientists Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and Shuji Nakamura who were praised for inventing blue LED lights.

The Nobel Peace Prize was handed out in a separate ceremony in Oslo, with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi and Pakistani schoolgirl campaigner Malala Yousafzai picking up the prizes.

 
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