SHARE
COPY LINK

NAZI

Swedish language class teacher in Holocaust row

A substitute teacher has been told off for challenging a Holocaust denier during a Swedish for Immigrants (SFI) class in southern Sweden.

Swedish language class teacher in Holocaust row
The former Nazi death camp Auschwitz. Photo: AP Photo/Alik Keplicz

The teacher claimed one of the students questioned the Holocaust after watching a news segment about the persecution of Jews in an SFI class at adult education centre Kärnan in Helsingborg, newspaper Helsingborgs Dagblad has reported.

But the student said he was misunderstood and claims the teacher yelled at him.

The school co-ordinator later criticized the teacher over the incident – which prompted the student to leave the classroom – according to a recorded meeting about the incident quoted by Helsingborgs Dagblad.

“The student talked to me and he said he felt misunderstood and insulted and painted as a Holocaust denier and Nazi,” the co-ordinator is quoted as saying on the recording.

“What he said was to deny the Holocaust,” replied the teacher.

“Yes, but he felt unfairly treated after he had been accused of that.”

“He wasn’t accused. I only told him it is not okay to say that the Jews just lie.”

The co-ordinator went on to later add: “You should remember that what we think of as history is the history we've been taught. When we have students who have read other history books there's no point setting facts against each other.”

School principal Lena Stenbäck told The Local on Thursday morning that she was to meet with the teacher on Tuesday to discuss the incident, which she said had left the student "very upset".

“I can’t say that the teacher has done anything wrong – I’m sure he tried his best. But a direct conflict in front of all the other students can so easily get out of hand and our opinion is that it is better to deal with that outside of class.”

“The class was about Auschwitz, so they were supposed to discuss it. If a student denies the Holocaust you should challenge that – it’s part of our mission as a school – but this is a matter of how you challenge it.”

The Holocaust has been a hot topic in Sweden recently, after Jews voiced concern of a fresh wave of anti-Semitism following the fatal attack on a synagogue in Copenhagen.

Last week, Swedish Radio was forced to apologize after an interviewer asked the Israeli Ambassador to Sweden if Jews themselves were responsible for anti-Semitism.

MALMÖ

Hunter shot jogger ‘by mistake’ Swedish court rules

A Norwegian hunter who shot a jogger in the thigh probably thought he was shooting a deer, a Swedish court has ruled.

Hunter shot jogger 'by mistake' Swedish court rules
75-year-old Olle Rosdahl was shot while out jogging. Photo: TT
Helsingborg District Court ruled that although video recorded by the hunter's night sights clearly showed that the figure he was aiming at looked like a person, it was nonetheless plausible that he had believed he was aiming at a roe deer.
 
“When we look at the film in hindsight, we know that it is a person,” Sofia Tollgerdt, the judge in the case, ruled. “But according to the research, there is a considerable risk that we overestimate our ability to recognize that at the moment of shooting.” 
 
The man, who faced a 12-year sentence if found guilty of attempted murder, was instead sentenced to one year behind bars, and ordered to pay damages of 38,000 Swedish kronor ($4084). 
 
The hunter's defence lawyer in court cited research showing that experienced hunters who are expecting to see a certain animal in a hunting environment can trick their own minds into seeing that animal even when it isn't there. 
 
The hunter was found guilty of causing serious bodily harm and using illegal infrared sights and illegal ammunition, and was severely criticized for deliberately shooting in the direction of a road which had buildings behind it. 
 
Ola Lavie, the prosecutor in the case, said that he had realized the man was likely to be found innocent when he was released from custody on the last day of the trial. 
 
 
“I was surprised when he was released so I'm not surprised now,” he told Swedish state broadcaster SVT. “All I can say is that the court made a completely different judgement in the case from the one I did.” 
 
Lavie said he had not yet decided whether to appeal the judgement. 
 
Olle Rosdahl, 75,  was having an early morning run in the countryside outside his home in Klippan, Skåne, at 4.30am on November 29 last year when he suddenly received a bullet in his hip. 
 
“I heard a blast and fell to the ground. I was shrieking 'What the hell kind of shooting is that',” Rosdahl told Swedish broadcaster SVT after it happened. 
 
When the 48-year-old Norwegian was initially arrested, police believed the shooting was accidental, but after  looking at the recordings from the sights saved on his phone, the prosecutor charged him with attempted murder.
SHOW COMMENTS