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Six tasty spots for a Swedish meat feast

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Six tasty spots for a Swedish meat feast
Stockholm's new Korv & Bubbel concept bar. Photo: The Local
08:14 CEST+02:00
As a new pop-up champagne and hot dog concept bar opens in Stockholm, The Local brings you six affordable destinations for meat lovers across Sweden, alongside our weekly interactive culture and entertainment listings.
1. Korv & Bubbel (Sausages and Bubbles), Stockholm
 
Stockholm's Södra Teatern has just launched a range of salty sausages designed to be washed down with a dry glass of champagne. The new menu is being served exclusively on the first floor South Bar of the multi-levelled building, while the theatre's restaurant undergoes renovation work between September 9th and 20th. When The Local attended a tasting on Wednesday lunchtime we found the service slow, but the hot dogs were scrumptious and a perfect size to snack on during a business meeting or after work drink with colleagues. The Garden Dog apppeared a particular hit with guests, featuring a beetroot topping. All priced at 98 kronor ($11.60) these sausages aren't a steal, but Södra Teatern does also offer almost unrivalled views over the capital's old town for free.
 

The launch of the new concept on Wednesday. Photo: The Local
 
2. Frick och Hagberg, Stockholm
 
Sweden's food truck industry swelled over the summer, despite plenty of wet weekends, with Frick och Hagberg scoring some of the tastiest reviews. Boasting a range of burgers made with organic Swedish beef and pork from Uppland and topped off with homemade mayonaise and fresh vegetables, if this wagon shows up in your neighbourhood, you won't be disappointed. Based mostly in the Stockholm area, you can follow the truck on Facebook to find out where it will be based over the next seven days. The team behind it also offer corporate catering.
 

A Frick och Hagberg burger. Photo: Frick och Hagberg
 
3. Bullen, Malmö
 
One of the highest rated traditonal Swedish food outlets in southern Sweden on Tripadvisor, Bullen is a cosy pub restaurant in Malmö offering a range of hearty dishes perfect for autumn and winter. Veal meatballs served with a whiskey cream sauce are a speciality here. Or try Bullen's popular house hamburger which comes with crispy bacon and melted cheddar cheese. The fried salted pork with onion sauce will also get your tastebuds bouncing. All main courses are around 200 kronor ($23.80)
 

Bullen has a cosy atmosphere. Photo: Bullen
 
4. Gourmet Korv, Gothenburg
 
Top Sweden-based travel blogger Steve Vickers describes this west Sweden delight as lifting "Sweden's takeaway hot dog tradition to new heights" and we couldn't agree more. The wild sausage is one of the most popular snacks on the menu, packing in venison flavoured with cognac and juniper. Cheese with lamb chorizo or spicy garlic sausage are among the other popular choices. Lunch with a drink here should cost no more than about 80–100 kronor ($9-11).
 

The outside of Gourmet Korv in Gothenburg. Photo: Steve Vickers
 
5. Meatballs for the People, Stockholm
 
Nestled in the heart of the trendy SoFo district on the hipster island of Södermalm, this restaurant offers not only some of the tastiest meatballs in the capital, but a very warm welcome too. At weekends you usually need to book ahead here, or there's a bar area with high stools where you can sip on a beer or cava while you're waiting. The Local recommends the meatballs with goats cheese as an especially yummy starter. Main dishes start from 179 kronor ($21). You can also buy take-out.
 

Meatballs for the People in Södermalm, Stockholm. Photo: Karl Ritter/TT
 
6. 7/11 and Pressbyrån, nationwide
 
No list about Swedish hot dogs would be complete without mentioning the bargain snacks sold at 7/11 and Pressbyrån (newsagent) stores on street corners and at train and bus stations around the country. While these sausages are about as far as way as you can get from fine Nordic dining, at around 15 kronor ($2.40) they are a handy option when you're short on time or cash and are pretty tasty too. If you're out partying with a group of Swedes don't be surprised if they grab one to help line their stomachs before heading out for the night, and another to soak up the alcohol on the way home.
 

A Pressbyrån store in Stockholm. Photo: Hasse Holmberg/TT
 
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