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Five winter sports events for daredevils and first-timers

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Five winter sports events for daredevils and first-timers
Ice skating in Sweden. Photo: Helena Wahlman/imagebank.sweden.se
06:00 CET+01:00
As the snow turns to slush, January might make you want to hibernate, but this is the perfect time to embrace Sweden's wintery sports. Our list includes options for all abilities, tastes and risk levels.

1. Explore Stockholm on the ice


Photo: Helena Wahlman/imagebank.sweden.se

See the Swedish capital as you've never seen it before by joining a group of ice skating guides for a tour around the city's frozen lakes. There are different options so you can go for five hours or a whole weekend, and it's suitable even for those with no experience of skating. The guides' local knowledge (they've been going since 1997) means they can find the best and safest areas for skating - just make sure to watch our safety video before you go!

Tickets start at 1,490 kronor for an Introductory Tour

2. Cheer on the ice hockey play-offs


The view from inside the arena. Photo: Prabhu Krishnamurthy


If you don't feel comfortable braving the ice yourself, you can always choose the safer, warmer option of watching an ice hockey match from the stands. The season has just kicked off and goes on until March, so there's plenty of time for you to learn the rules and form an allegiance to your chosen team. There are matches all over the country, but we recommend heading to Gothenburg's Scandinavium area. Regional team Frölunda's home attendance has been the largest in the league for the past decade – why not join the crowds? This weekend they take on Stockholm's Djurgården.

Tickets start at just 100 kronor.

3. Run a fire-lit nighttime route


Skansen provides a picturesque running route - even more so in winter. Photo: Nick Sieger/Flickr

Stockholm's Winter Run on January 30th is the perfect antidote to the January darkness. The 10km route at the magical Skansen Open Air Museum will be lit up with fire artists and light shows, with DJs to motivate and energize the thousands of runners expected to take part. Whether you join in or simply watch, it's sure to brighten up your weekend.

Tickets are 400 kronor.

4. Get excited about bandy


Sweden playing in a previous championship. Photo: Anatoly Ustinenko/AFP

If you're planning on staying in Sweden long term, you're going to have to learn about bandy, and now is the perfect time as the World Bandy Championships, taking place in Russia, are broadcast on Kanal 5, with the youth championships on January 28th and the World Championship beginning on February 1st. Sweden have been pipped to the post by Russia for the last three years, so support your adopted nation from your sofa or a local bar. Once you've caught the bandy bug, you could join your local club or look out for matches to watch in person, such as at Zinkensdamms Idrottsplats.

5. Check out some snowmobiles


Photo: Heather Sunderland/Flickr

From January 28th-31st, a 'power sports' fair is taking place at Gotheburg's Swedish Exhibition and Congress Centre. Perfect for adventure sports fans, the exhibition will include motorcycles, scooters, quads, watercrafts and snowmobiles.

Tickets are 160 kronor for adults, 50 kronor for kids

 


 

Don't forget to check out our interactive calendar below for more events taking place in Sweden this week

 

 

 

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