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Man, 23, wakes up after Stockholm metro 'attack'

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Man, 23, wakes up after Stockholm metro 'attack'
File photo of Stockholm's T-centralen station. Photo: Fredrik Sandberg/TT
17:43 CEST+02:00
A 23-year-old man left fighting for his life after he was allegedly pushed in front of a train at Stockholm's central underground station is on the road to recovery, the prosecutor heading the investigation has confirmed.

The man suffered a punctured lung and several fractures, including to his skull, when he fell onto the tracks and was hit by a train at Stockholm's T-centralen metro station on May 31st.

His girlfriend, who witnessed the incident, told police at the time that he had been pushed by another man in what appeared to be an unprovoked attack.

On Monday prosecutor Carl Mellberg confirmed that the 23-year-old had come out of an induced coma.

The Aftonbladet newspaper reported that he had written a message on his Facebook page to thank his friends for their support, saying that he was now facing a period of rehabilitation.

An unnamed relative told the tabloid: "It is true, we're so happy. It's been a difficult period and this means so much. But he's got a difficult process ahead of him, which includes taking in everything that has happened."

A 34-year-old suspect caught after police released CCTV images from the underground station remains in custody on suspicion of attempted murder. His lawyer has previously told Swedish media that he suffers from mental health problems and is undergoing a psychiatric evaluation.

He is understood to have declined to comment on the allegations when questioned by police, but is expected to be charged by Friday.

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