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OLYMPICS

CYCLING

Patched-up Swede wins women’s mountain bike gold

Battle-scarred Jenny Rissveds won the Olympic Games women's mountain bike gold medal on Saturday, just a week after needing 10 stitches in her knee and elbow following a training fall.

Patched-up Swede wins women's mountain bike gold
Rissveds won the gold just a week after needing 10 stitches in her knee and elbow following a training fall. Photo: TT

World youth champion Rissveds, 22, finished 37 seconds ahead of Poland's Maja Wloszczowska, a silver medallist also in Beijing in 2008, and close to a minute and a half in front of Catherine Pendrel of Canada.

The win was a first gold medal for Sweden in any Olympic cycling event since Bernt Johansson who won the men's road race in 1976 in Montreal.

“I just came here a week ago. I crashed in training, and ended up with six stitches in my knee and four in my elbow and I thought this is not going to work at all,” said the new champion.

“But the day after that I went out on the course and I felt so good. I like this course but I was a little bit scared after that. After a few laps I felt good enough.”

In an indication of the bruising nature of the sport, Wloszczowska missed the London Games with a leg fracture.

“Before London I was one of the favourites for the gold medal, but I broke my leg three weeks before the Games, so I had to focus for another four years,” said the Pole.

“It was not easy but it was all needed to be lucky today.”

CYCLING

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021

Demand for bicycles has soared in Europe during the coronavirus pandemic, but conversely the global supply is at record low levels, with consumers having to wait months or over a year for their bike of choice.

VIDEO: Why you may struggle to buy a bike in Europe in 2021
Photo: Stocksnap/Pixabay

Bikes are projected to outsell cars in Europe by two to one by 2030.   

But 2021 will not be an easy year to buy a bike in many European countries, especially if you have a particular model in mind. 

Firstly, there's been a huge surge in demand for bikes during the pandemic, as Europeans looked for ways to stay fit and move around more freely without having to worry about being exposed to Covid-19 on public transport.

On the flip side, bike production in China, which supplies almost the entire global market, has practically ground to a halt.

The same can be said for bicycle accessories and components, which are either not being produced in Chinese factories currently or held up for months in ports in Asia due to the reduction of capacity in shipping.

 

In this short report, video producer Alex Dunham explores the issue of Europe's bike shortage in 2021.

 

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