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Swedish park unveils Europe's first Elk-hut

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Swedish park unveils Europe's first Elk-hut
The elk hut is intended for families with children. Photo: Wrågården/Facebook
14:41 CEST+02:00
A tiny wildlife park in central Sweden has created what it believes is Europe's first “elk-hut”, a cabin carved into the shape of an elk by one of the country's leading chainsaw sculptors.
The hut is big enough for a family of five and is situated right in the middle of the park's elk and bison enclosure. 
 
“You will be able to stand there on the hut's terrace and pet the elk. It will be something extraordinary. I think we are unique in Europe,” Henrik Alexandersson, owner of the Wrågården park, about 130km outside Gothenburg, told Expressen newspaper. 
 
The structure has been carved in wood by chainsaw artist Sören Niklasson, renowned for sculpting a series of toadstool and tree stump-shaped huts at the Norrqvarn hotel, as well as for his work creating the Nordic region's largest wooden Santa Claus in the nearby town of Skövde. 
 
“The German visitors have been lyrical about it,” Alexandersson said. “You can expect a unique and exciting experience.” 
 
He said that he had long considered offering accommodation but had wanted to provide something more interesting than traditional red and white Swedish log houses. 
 
“I felt it should be something special. I was mad enough to bite,” he said. 
 
“The idea is that it will mainly be families with children who stay here. It is going to be an incredible experience for children. I also expect a lot of foreign guests. Elk are really close to the hearts of German people.” 
 
Here is Niklasson at work on his Santa Claus in the Skövde in 2012.
 
 
 
Here are some of his other hut creations.
 
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