SHARE
COPY LINK
NORDIC NOIR

DENMARK

Shooting starts on The Bridge – season four

The day that Nordic Noir fans have waited for is here: shooting has started for The Bridge.

Shooting starts on The Bridge – season four
Sofia Helin as Saga Norén. Photo: Carolina Romare/Filmlance International AB

The creators behind the Danish-Swedish co-production revealed on The Bridge's official Instagram account on Thursday evening that shooting for the fourth season had got under way.

“HERE WE GO,” they announced in caps. “Season 4 has finally started shooting!”

 

HERE WE GO Season 4 has finally started shooting! #BronBroen #Filmlance #NimbusFilm

A photo posted by @thebridge_official on Nov 17, 2016 at 6:45am PST

Writers have previously confirmed that the fourth season is also going to be the final season of the Nordic Noir mega hit. Unlike previous seasons, in which the investigation has mainly been based in Malmö, Sweden, this time it will be carried out in Denmark.

As The Local reported earlier this year, the premiere date for the fourth season has not yet been set, but the eight episodes are expected to air in spring 2018 in the Nordic countries.

See also: We visited 'murder spots' in Malmö from The Bridge

Sofia Helin and Thure Lindhardt will both return as Swedish and Danish detectives Saga Norén and Henrik Sabroe in the new season, which kicks off around a year-and-a-half after the last episode.

One thing we know for sure is that it is likely to be one of the goriest seasons to date.

“It will be the most nasty start The Bridge has had,” writer Hans Rosenfeldt told the Expressen tabloid back in August. “It's a very unpleasant opening if we have our way.”

In another interview he added: “There's going to be a case to solve and then both lead characters will have a personal journey, and the less I say about that the better, I think. But one small detail is that we're going to find out where Saga got her Porsche from.”

DENMARK

Swedish politician condemns Denmark’s ‘shit sandwich’ sewage plan

Copenhagen's water utility has been asked to postpone a plan to dump 290,000 cubic meters of untreated raw sewage into the Øresund Strait in the face of outrage from citizens and politicians in both Sweden and Denmark.

Swedish politician condemns Denmark's 'shit sandwich' sewage plan
Swimmers taking part in the Øresund Challenge back in 2011. Photo: Dennis Lehmann/Ritzau Scanpix
After a meeting on Monday afternoon, Ninna Hedeager Olsen, Copenhagen's environmental mayor, said she had asked civil servants to ask Hofor postpone the release until the autumn. 
 
“There has been an opportunity for Hofor to postpone the test work they will be doing until October,” she told state broadcaster DR. “That is why I have asked the administration to demand it.” 
 
Politicians in both Denmark and Sweden were up in arms on Sunday when details of the plan became known, forcing the utility to first postpone the release by 24 hours, and now postpone it further. 
 
Niels Paarup-Petersen, a member of parliament for Sweden's Centre Party, told The Local that the plan was just the latest in a long list of insults Denmark had thrown at its Scandinavian neighbour. 
 
“We’ve been served shit sandwich after shit sandwich over the last couple of years, but we've never been served so much shit in one go as this,” he said.  
 
Jacob Næsager, a city politician with Denmark's Conservative party, said that it was astonishing that the plan had been approved. 
 
 
“Many people want to swim in the Øresund, and I think it is extremely disgusting that people literally have to swim in other people's shit,” he said. 
 
Finn Rudaizky, a city politician for the Danish People's Party on the city's environment committee, called the plan “completely crazy”.
 
After Olsen announced the decision to postpone the plan, Morten Østergaard leader of Denmark's Social Liberal party congratulated those who had spotted it and launched a protest. 
 
“Good God, that was hanging by a thread, but hats off for the action,” he said. “'Shit good', as Niels Paarup from our sister party wrote.” 

Paarup-Petersen told The Local that he recognised that the utility had to empty the sewer to allow construction to go ahead at Svanemølleholmen in Nordhavn.
 
But he said there was no need to dump so much sewage in one go right at the start of the summer swimming season.  
 
 
“They can spread it out over a longer period, they can do it in a better season when people won't be swimming and there might be better currents,” he said. “It would also be possible to plan it a bit better so it will be released over more days.” 
 
He said he planned to work together with the Danish Social Liberal party to put in place greater environmental protections around the Øresund. 
 
“In the long term we have to find solutions, because there are solutions that can mean that the Øresund no longer needs to be a sewer,” he said. 
 
In a memo to the mayor issued on Monday, city civil servants said that they could not withdraw the permit issued to Hofor, as it had been drawn up in accordance with the correct procedures. 
 
Hedeager Olsen said she would now launch ask a team of  external experts in law and the environment to investigate why the city's civil servants believed it was right to authorise the discharge. 
 
“When the administration today concludes in a note that they believe the case management has been correct, and at the same time you hear environmental professors and others say that it is not, it is important to get the case investigated at a fundamental level,” she told DR. 
 
 
SHOW COMMENTS