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This bizarre Swedish sausage is Zlatan's favourite food

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This bizarre Swedish sausage is Zlatan's favourite food
'I'm starting to feel a bit peckish.' Photo: AP Photo/Ariel Schalit
10:28 CET+01:00
Tell us if you like this, and we'll tell you how long you've lived in Sweden.

Zlatan Ibrahimovic grew up in Malmö, which boasts an up-and-coming culinary scene, Michelin chefs and the best fast-food falafel in Sweden.

He has since had the chance to dine at some of the most expensive restaurants in both Italy and France, two countries famous for their cuisine.

But the Swedish footballer's top gastronomic experience is neither Escargots nor Spaghetti Bolognese. In an interview with public broadcaster SVT's news programme for children, he revealed his choice.

Pasta and falukorv.

"I like Helena's food," he praised his long-time partner when asked what they and their sons Maximilan and Vincent like to eat. "She is a good cook. Macaroni and falukorv is the favourite. We all eat that."

READ ALSO: Nine Swedish eating habits that confuse foreigners


Swedish falukorv. Photo: Leif R Jansson/TT

What kind of Swedish delicacy is falukorv, some of you may be wondering? It is a cooked Swedish sausage that consists of grated pork, beef or horse mixed with potato starch, onion, salt and other spices. 

It originated in the mines in Falun (its name means Falu sausage) in the Dalarna region hundreds of years ago, and has enjoyed EU TSG (traditional specialities guaranteed) status since 2001.

It can be eaten raw as a snack, gratinated whole in the oven, Sausage Stroganoff (a Swedish bastardization of Beef Stroganoff) or as is the most common, fried in slices and served with elbow macaroni and ketchup.

Swedes love falukorv. Many foreigners find this strange.

"It's like the worst kind of fake processed meat," The Local's British managing editor once described it. "It's not so much the taste but the texture, it has no kind of substance whatsover. Your teeth just glide through it."

READ ALSO: The ten most disgusting Swedish foods

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