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Sweden's December set for stormy start

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Sweden's December set for stormy start
File photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT
15:32 CET+01:00
Sweden is bracing itself for extreme weather all over the country as December gets underway, with the Swedish Meteorological Institute (SMHI) warning of storms, high winds and ice.
The extreme cold has already caused disruption in southern parts of the country, with delays at Stockholm's Arlanda Airport as well as on the city's metro system.
 
High winds have also caused the cancellations of a number of ferry departures in Gotland.
 
The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrogological Institute (SMHI) is now warning of strong northerly winds in both Gotland and Öland. An extreme weather notice has also been issued for the northern coast of Uppland due to heavy snow.
 
Roads are expected to become treacherous due to the icy conditions.
 
"If it is necessary to go out, utmost caution must be applied," meteorologist Therese Fougman of SMHI told news agency TT.
 
The weather conditions caused a number of delays to departures from Stockholm's Arlanda airport on Sunday.
 
Trains on the Stockholm Metro's red and green lines have also been delayed or cancelled due to slippery tracks.
 
The conditions have also caused a number of minor accidents on the icy roads. Fortunately, no fatalities have been reported so far, according to police sources.
 
SMHI has also issued a storm warning for all of Sweden's coastal waters as well as the Vänern lake. 
 
Heavy snow and strong winds persisted in the eastern Uppland province throughout Saturday nigh, which may also lead to icy roads. 
 
In the north, a warm front has brought in increased snowfall from the west, with 5-10 centimetres of snow falling in the Lapland and Ångermanland regions.
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