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Serial rapist arrested at Stockholm Arlanda airport

A suspected serial rapist who had fled to Thailand has been flown back to Sweden's Arlanda airport, where he was arrested on Friday morning.

Serial rapist arrested at Stockholm Arlanda airport
File photo: Johan Nilsson/TT
The 38-year-old man is suspected of four counts of aggravated rape between May 17th and May 19th, and of one count of unlawful deprivation of liberty. The crimes were carried out in the Örebro area in central Sweden as well as in other locations.
 
The suspect had fled to Thailand, where he was arrested at the airport in Bangkok earlier in June.
 
He was flown back to Sweden on a regular Thai Airways flight, escorted by police officers who handed him over to the Swedish police when the plane landed at Stockholm's Arlanda airport early in the morning on Midsummer's Eve, June 23rd.
 
 
Fellow passengers on the plane said the man was sitting at the back of the cabin in handcuffs, Kvällsposten reports.
 
“He was taken off the plane last, and Swedish police officers were waiting for him at the bottom of the stairs,” one passenger told Kvällsposten.
 
The suspect has served time on two previous occasions for different types of sexual violence. In 2003 he was sentenced to seven years in prison for aggravated rape and aggravated sexual exploitation of a minor, according to SVT
 
Six years later he was sentenced to eight years imprisonment after having repeatedly raped two 17-year-old girls.
 

TRAVEL NEWS

Security queue at Stockholm Arlanda now down to ten minutes

The queue at security at Stockholm's Arlanda airport was down to ten minutes on Friday morning, after a new terminal was opened and temporary staff brought in.

Security queue at Stockholm Arlanda now down to ten minutes

At 7am, the queue at security at the airport’s Terminal 5 had fallen from 45 minutes to ten minutes, although the airport operators says queue times may increase as people start to leave Sweden on the weekend. 

“We’ve managed to get through the morning rush, it’s levelling out now,” Ellen Laurin, a press spokesperson for Swedavia, told TT, although she said queue times could rise again during the day and again on Saturday morning. “There could be a heavy footfall, and June is generally a big month for travel, so queue times could go up and down over the day.” 

She said that the company had now posted more of its own personnel to the airport, had struck a deal with a recruitment company to provide more temporary staff, and had also shifted passengers from many planes to the newly opened Terminal 4. 

“It’s had an effect. We have freed up both more area and also new capacity by opening Terminal 4.” 

She said that the company was advising travellers to check in online, or, if they have no baggage, to go directly to the security controls, as well as to check with their airline how many hours before the flight departs check-in opens.  

The improved situation at Arlanda came as Sweden’s government received the results of an inquiry into what was behind the queues at the airport.

Karl-Petter Thorwaldsson, Sweden’s business minister, told the Dagens Nyheter newspaper that he was “not satisfied” with how the airline had handled the resurgence in travel after the Covid-19 pandemic. 

“It’s always easy to be clever with hindsight, but obviously we’re not satisfied with the way Swedavia has handled this during the spring. It would make no sense to say that we’re satisfied when people have been stuck in hour-long queues at Arlanda.” 

Thorwaldsson said that the airport operators couldn’t do much about the time it is taking Sweden’s Säpo security police to carry out background checks on people being hired to work at security controls, but it could have started paying those who are applying for the job salaries while they waited to be cleared, so they did not lose patience get a job elsewhere. 

Thorwaldsson also suggested that the airport could have hired people to help guide passengers around the airport several weeks earlier.

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