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Sweden's big cities predicted to have coldest winter in five years

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Sweden's big cities predicted to have coldest winter in five years
Stockholm in the winter of 2012. A repeat could be on the cards. Photo: Hasse Holmberg/TT
11:20 CET+01:00
Sweden's big cities are about to face their coldest winter in five years, according to a meteorologist's new long-term prediction.

SVT's Nitzan Cohen compiled data and studied atmospheric trends in order to assess the most likely weather between December and February. And the expert’s analysis suggests it'll be a winter of two halves for Sweden, similar to the one the country experienced in 2012-2013.

With jet streams predicted to split into two parts, in the south there could be more snow and slightly chillier temperatures than recent years, while in the north, it could be a slightly milder winter than usual.

"It could get a bit colder than usual in the south and larger areas are likely to be covered in snow," he explained in his prediction.

"Inland in Norrland and in the hills there's always snow. But it will maybe be perceived as a bit milder," he added.

For a reminder of the winter Sweden experienced in 2012-13, a December blizzard caused transport havoc across the country, and even by March things hadn't improved much.


Malmö airport in December 2012, when even the southernmost parts of Sweden were hit by blizzards. Photo: Johan Nilsson/TT

If Cohen's prediction comes true, Sweden's big population hubs Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö (which are all in the southern half of the country) will have a colder and snowier time than usual.

Those who live in the north may wonder what all the fuss is about though. This is what Kiruna looked like on Monday morning:

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