Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Women consider environmental impact of shopping more than men: Swedish poll

Share this article

Women consider environmental impact of shopping more than men: Swedish poll
Consumers said they find it difficult to make environmentally friendly holiday purchases. Photo: Stina Stjernkvist/TT
07:26 CET+01:00
Women think more about the environmental impact of items when they are shopping than men do, a new survey by the Swedish Consumer Agency shows.

Almost half of women surveyed (49 percent) said they think it is important to know how a purchase impacts the environment, but for men the figure was significantly lower (39 percent).

Swedes said they find it easiest to make environmentally friendly choices when shopping for dairy, fruit and vegetables, and appliances. The hardest kind of purchase to make in an environmentally conscious way is buying holidays, clothing, and furniture, according to the poll.

"In markets that are top five there are established environmentally friendly labels, unlike in the bottom markets, which often lack those labels. That maybe impacts whether it's perceived to be difficult or easy (to make an environmentally conscious purchase)," Swedish Consumer Agency analyst Johan Jarelin said in a statement.

READ ALSO: Poll shows Swedes worry about climate change

The survey also showed that Swedish consumers underestimate the environmental impact of food purchases.

"Consumers judge the consumption of food as not so problematic, but the reality is different. Of the 10 markets with the biggest climate-change related emissions meat is in second place after vehicle emissions. Dairy products are fourth, bread and other cereal products in fifth, and fruit and vegetables eighth."

READ ALSO: Sweden presents new climate law and zero emissions goal

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

Meet the Italian music entrepreneur who went from being hired to hiring in Sweden

In 2007, guitar-maker Michele Benincaso found himself in the first generation of music tech entrepreneurs moving to Stockholm. Now he's at the helm of the award-winning startup company, MIND Music Labs, and hiring music tech talent from all over the world just four years after launching.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement