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Young Swedes eating too much junk food: study

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Young Swedes eating too much junk food: study
A new study sheds light on Swedish teenagers' eating habits. Photo: Claudio Bresciani/TT
12:16 CEST+02:00
Most young people in Sweden are eating too little fruit and veg and too much meat, candy, and soda, according to a new study.

Sweden's youngsters aren't eating well, a study from Sweden's National Food Administration (Livsmedelsverket)  has found. 

In fact, just one in ten eats the recommended fruit and vegetable intake of 500 grammes a day, the study found. 

While young Swedes are actually eating less candy, soda, and snacks than they were in the last study of its kind in 2003, the sweet stuff still makes up 17 percent of their calorie intake. 

They're also eating more meat and charcuterie than is healthy for both themselves and the environment, the study said. 

Anna Karin Lindroos, a nutritionist at Livsmedelsverket, said some teens were eating "a worrying amount" of junk food. 

"Candy, cakes, snacks and soda is taking the place of normal food, which can lead to a lack of important nutrients," she said in a statement. 

The study found that children who have parents with low levels of education were more likely to be overweight or obsese. These children were also less likely to eat vegetables and fish. 

The results were based on the studies of over 3,000 children across secondary school, typically between the ages of 10 and 18.

And things don't get better once Swedes reach adulthood, at least according to obesity figures from 2017

Indeed, some 51 percent of the Swedish population aged between 16 and 84 are either overweight or obese, according to a report from the Public Health Agency (Folkhälsomyndigheten).

"Good and equal health is a basic condition for a society's progress. Our report shows that there needs to be continued strong efforts made in public health in Sweden, and the work must be an important part of social planning," the health agency's director general Johan Carlson said at the time.

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