SHARE
COPY LINK
PRESENTED BY INVEST ICELAND

QUIZ: Which influential Icelander are you?

Iceland may have a population of just over 330,000 people (all with equally unpronounceable names) but that doesn't stop it churning out a stream of globally-renowned people.

QUIZ: Which influential Icelander are you?
Photo: sam741002 /Depositphotos

You might not know them all by name but many of their innovations in key sectors like data centers, life sciences and energy dependent industries have changed and shaped the world as we know it.

Take The Local's quiz below to find out which influential Icelander you are.

Which influential Icelander are you?

Björk

 

Björk Guðmundsdóttir is an Icelandic music phenomenon. With a career spanning four decades, she is famous for her unique and eclectic musical style that is influenced by a range of different genres. Born in Reykjavik, no fewer than 31 of Björk's singles have reached the top 40 on pop charts around the world. Her most famous hits include “It's Oh So Quiet”, “Army of Me”, and “Hyperballad”.

Hjalmar Gislason

 

A self-professed 'tech nerd', Hjalmar Gislason is the founder of four software

companies and currently VP of Data at Business Intelligence company Qlik.

Hjalmar joined Qlik through the acquisition of DataMarket, a company he

founded in 2008. He is an angel investor and advisor to several

Icelandic startup companies

Össur Kristinsson

 

Össur Kristinsson is a pioneer of silicone technology. Himself a prosthetist and a prosthetic user, he is the founder of Össur, a company that develops, manufactures and sells non-invasive orthopaedics equipment, including bracing and support products, compression therapy, and prosthetics. His passion for boats led to his invention of the ÖK Hull, a revolutionary hull-and-keel technology predicted to ultimately disrupt marine industries globally.

Vigdís Finnbogadóttir

 

Vigdís Finnbogadóttir served as the fourth President of Iceland from 1980 to 1996. She was the world's first democratically directly elected female president. With a presidency of exactly sixteen years, she also remains the longest-serving elected female head of state of any country to date.

Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir

 

Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir is a politician and previously served as the first female Prime Minister of Iceland as well as the world's first openly lesbian head of government. Until her retirement from elective office in 2012, Jóhanna was Iceland's longest-serving member of Parliament. In 1994, when she lost a bid to head the Social Democratic Party, she raised her fist and declared “Minn tími mun koma!” (“My time will come!”), a phrase that became a popular Icelandic expression.

Hilmar Veigar

 

Hilmar has been CEO of Icelandic video game developer CCP Games since 2004. Under his management, the critically-acclaimed spacefaring game EVE Online has celebrated ten consecutive years of subscriber growth. In September 2018, Hilmar announced he had agreed to sell CCP to Black Desert Online creator Pearl Abyss of South Korea for $425 million. Hilmar is also active on a number of boards and committees involved with Icelandic information technology and innovation.

Would you rather…

You enjoy…

You dream of…

How would you describe yourself?

You're helping to plan a party. What's your role?

What do you usually do on a Friday night?

READ ALSO: 12 unexpected facts you probably didn't know about Iceland

This content was produced by The Local Creative Studio and sponsored by Invest in Iceland.

 

FOOTBALL

Why this Swede is now a legend in Iceland

Iceland may have been eliminated from Euro 2016 after a 5-2 defeat to France, but their departing Swedish coach will still go down as a legend in the country for his feats.

Why this Swede is now a legend in Iceland
Iceland's Swedish manager Lars Lagerbäck. Photo: Ciaran Fahey/AP/TT

Lars Lagerbäck's final act as Iceland manager was to mastermind an incredible run to the last eight at the Euros from the tournament’s least-fancied team. And midfielder Gylfi Sigurdsson says his boss will always be remembered for what he has done for Icelandic football.

“He is one of the guys that took us to France and the quarter-finals. He will be a legend in Icelandic football history,” the Swansea player told AFP.

“He helped us get to the finals and achieve some of our dreams, so it is very sad that he is leaving and I’m sure we’ll be in contact for the rest of our lives.”

Lagerbäck’s time with Iceland in France was his seventh major finals, having led his native Sweden to five and Nigeria at the 2010 World Cup. He believes the future for Iceland can be bright, even without his expertise.

“Hopefully the FA in Iceland and clubs can take this in, and perhaps use the income from this tournament and put it into a project to help develop young players, I think the future is pretty good,” the manager said.

“If you look upon the whole tournament, as a newcomer, to reach the quarter-finals has been absolutely fantastic.”

The big challenge for the island nation is to replace him. Lagerbäck will now hand over the reins to co-coach and part-time dentist Hemir Hallgrimsson.

“It’s been a fantastic journey these last four-and-a-half years. All the support I’ve got from everywhere I’ve been in Iceland and around the game has been absolutely fantastic,” the Swede said.

“It’s something really, really extra this tournament with all the fans coming here, and what he heard from back home and all the interest and positivity.”

Taking Iceland deep into the knockout stage of their first major finals has made Lagerbäck a coach in demand, with rumours of an offer from England even touted in the British press.

And while the Swede had previously suggested he may retire after Euro 2016, he now appears to be less certain.

“I’m not closing any doors. Right now I can’t think of a 100 percent coaching job, but if someone came with something interesting, of course I would listen,” he told Swedish broadcaster Viasat.