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Everything you need to know about the Nobel Prize ceremony

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Everything you need to know about the Nobel Prize ceremony
Preparations underway at Stockholm's City Hall ahead of the Nobel ceremony. Photo: Christine Olsson / TT
09:56 CET+01:00
The glitziest event of the year is about to kick off in Stockholm, with this year's batch of Nobel Laureates preparing to receive their prizes in a star-studded ceremony on Monday evening.

December 10th is the date of the ceremony each year, chosen because it is the date on which inventor Alfred Nobel died, back in 1896.

The prizes awarded in Nobel's honour are handed out by the Swedish king at Stockholm Concert Hall from 4.30pm, with a world-famous banquet following at the City Hall at 7pm.

The dinner is high-profile, with the 1,300-strong guest list featuring royalty, top politicians and academics plus international guests. But it's a cause of excitement and conversation among the general population too, with around one million Swedes (that's a tenth of the country's entire population) expected to follow along from home by tuning in to the live broadcast on SVT.

There's always interest in the seating plan, released a few days before, and the menu, kept secret apart from some hints dropped in press releases. This year, for example, we know that the food will be based on "classic Swedish" recipes, with plenty of vegetables and a gelatin-free dessert.

What's not a secret, of course, is who will be winning the coveted prizes, which were awarded back in October, with the exception of the prize in literature which was postponed until 2019 after a summer of scandals within the prize-awarding body.

The Local covered the announcements live from Sweden's Royal Academy, and the prize-winning work included cancer therapy and laser physics. 

The winners arrived in the Swedish capital last Thursday for Nobel Week, which includes a selection of events put on for them as well as the lectures they are required to give. 

READ ALSO: Who was Alfred Nobel, the Swedish scientist behind the Nobel Prize?

 
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