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Worker shortage: These are the most in-demand jobs in Sweden

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Worker shortage: These are the most in-demand jobs in Sweden
Which are the professions crying out for workers in Sweden? File photo: Sofia Sabel/imagebank.sweden.se
15:06 CEST+02:00
There is a major shortage of qualified workers on the Swedish job market, the country's Public Employment Agency (Arbetsförmedlingen) warns in a new report in which it updated its job forecasts for 200 professions. So which are the hottest jobs in Sweden right now?

Of the 200 professions analyzed, the agency said there was a shortage of qualified staff -- and therefore a high chance of finding employment for those who fit the bill -- in three quarters of the total. The majority of these required tertiary education or other specialized training.

People trained as teachers, IT developers, or in a medical profession all had a high chance of finding work, according to the analysis which was in line with previous studies.

"The best way to increase one's chances of a firm placement in the job market is an upper secondary school or university education," said Arbetsförmedlingen analyst Olle Ahlberg, who said the shortage in these jobs "has both persisted and increased".

Ahlberg also stressed the importance of increasing the employment rate among foreign-born people in Sweden. Over the last few years, most new jobs have gone to foreign-born workers, but there remains a significant gap in employment rate between those born in Sweden and those born elsewhere.

"Getting foreign-born people into the job market is crucial for employers' possibilities to recruit and for the employment rate to increase," said Ahlberg. 

WORKING IN SWEDEN:

Over the next year, the prognosis looked brightest for civil engineers, technicians, doctors, nurses, teachers including after-school teachers, and various other professions in the care sector.

Professions with a shortage of workers which did not require higher education included bus, tram and lorry driver, mechanics and electricians, waiters and cooks, and assistant nurses.

On the other hand, professions which only required a short training such as receptionists, shop assistants, and caretakers were among the most difficult to find work in, according to the analysis.

Meanwhile, the culture, media and design industries remained tough to break into due to high levels of competition and a surplus of qualified workers. 

READ ALSO: 'Not utilizing the skills of immigrants is a huge waste of resources'

 

 
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