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#MySweden: 'It's so easy to discover new places constantly'

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#MySweden: 'It's so easy to discover new places constantly'
Photo: Rebeca Gonzalez Suarez
07:04 CEST+02:00
Every week one of The Local's readers takes over our Instagram. Today, Rebeca Gonzalez Suarez shows us her Sweden.
How old are you and what do you normally spend your days doing?
 
I'm 37 years old and I work at Uppsala University. I am a particle physicist and I teach, mentor and supervise students, and carry out research.
 
My research is on high energy collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, but most of the people who study LHC data do so remotely, like me. I live in Stockholm, very close to the central train station, and I commute by train. 
 
 
When and why did you move to your city/neighbourhood?
 
We moved to Sweden in May 2018. I had obtained a personal grant from the Swedish Research Council to establish myself in Uppsala University; and my husband had a great professional opportunity in Stockholm, working on medical physics for cancer treatment. After spending the previous ten years in Geneva, Switzerland, we both thought it was time to move on. 
 
We first lived in Uppsala. Elias is Swedish and though he also lived in Switzerland until last year, he had kept his flat in Uppsala from his student days. We bought an apartment and moved to Stockholm November 1st. Elias works very centrally in Stockholm and it was important that I would get the best possible commute. We were very lucky to find a flat literally five mins from the central station that was within our budget. We are still incredulous that we managed this. 
 
 
What do you love the most about your city/neighbourhood?
 
Living right in the center of Stockholm is awesome because you feel like you are on vacation 24/7. All the sights, all the museums, all the water, and all the shops are just at your doorstep. It feels so easy to see everything and to constantly discover new places and new restaurants! It is really beautiful and feels completely unreal. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Coming back home with this view is 🙌🏻 #Stockholm #MySweden #TheLocalSweden

A post shared by The Local Sweden (@thelocalsweden) on

 
 
What annoys you the most about your city/neighbourhood?
 
Being central means that there are people everywhere all the time! And most of these people are tourists that are just strolling randomly or taking pictures. It is really nice to have people visiting but when you are carrying groceries or trying to get to somewhere fast, it is a bit of an obstacle race.

There are also not so many people living in the area, so the supermarket options are worse than in properly residential neighborhoods. I also have a car (which I don't use for commuting, only for trips) and keeping it in a parking lot is quite problematic.
 
 
How should I spend a day in your city/neighbourhood?
 
You can start by visiting the town hall and have a look at Södermalm from there, then follow the water passing by the Royal Opera House all the way to Skeppsholmen (stopping by at any of the amazing museums along the way), maybe having light lunch at the café of ArkDes.
 
Walk to Kastelholmen, check out the views, then go back, being careful not miss the boats along the east side of Skeppsholmen. Walk around Kungsträdgården, do some shopping in the center, walk down Drottninggatan to Gamla Stan, stroll around and then walk up the hill to Södermalm. Get dinner there (anywhere because Söder is awesome) and go to see sunset from Ivar Los Park. You can walk back by Riddarholmen. There are some cool rooftop bars in Norrmalm for an evening drink. 
 
 
What's a fun fact not everyone knows about your city/neighbourhood?
 
That there are regular people living among the offices in Norrmalm! 
 
 
 
Follow Rebeca on Instagram here. To find out how you can become The Local's next #MySweden host, click HERE.
 
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