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Foreigners are more worried about losing their job in Sweden

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Foreigners are more worried about losing their job in Sweden
Foreign-born employees also feel they have less of a say when it comes to planning their schedule. Photo: Stina Stjernkvist/TT
13:04 CET+01:00
International residents are far more likely to be concerned about losing their job in Sweden than people born in the country, according to a new report.

The Local has previously reported on the unemployment gap between native Swedes and immigrants in many articles. But not only that. A new report also suggests that employed workers born outside of Sweden are also far less likely to feel empowered in their job, and far more likely to worry about unemployment.

People who were born outside of Europe and have been in Sweden less than 10 years are the worst affected: 42 percent report that they are worried about losing their job, according to the new report 'Integration – a description of the situation in Sweden', released by national number-crunchers Statistics Sweden.

The longer you've been here, on average, the more secure you feel.

Around a quarter of people born outside of Europe who have lived in Sweden more than 10 years, and around a fifth of all European workers in Sweden, are worried about the prospect of unemployment.

But there's still a gap compared to native Swedes. Only eight percent of people born in Sweden with at least one Swedish-born parent are worried about losing their job, according to Statistics Sweden's report.

THE LOCAL'S READERS:

Foreign-born employees, especially non-Europeans with less than 10 years in Sweden, also tend to feel that they have less opportunity to influence their work situation than their native Swedish counterparts.

In that group, 31 percent of employees aged 16-64 say they have no influence on the planning of their work and 59 percent say they have no influence on their work hours.

More than two in five Europeans also say they have no influence on their work hours, compared to 27 percent among those born in Sweden with at least one Swedish parent.

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Housing is another issue where there is a huge gap between the groups, and where non-Europeans who have lived less than 10 years in Sweden again are the worst affected.

"In this group, nearly one in three persons, 31 percent, lives in housing with more than two persons per bedroom. Among those born outside Europe who have lived in Sweden for at least 10 years and persons born in Europe, around 10 percent live in overcrowded housing," stated Statistics Sweden.

"The corresponding share among Swedish-born persons who have at least one Swedish-born parent is two percent."

The full report can be read here, and an English-language summary here.

 
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