Greta Thunberg donates $100,000 to help children affected by the coronavirus

Greta Thunberg donates $100,000 to help children affected by the coronavirus
Greta Thunberg taking part in a digital event about the coronavirus and climate crises. Photo: Jessica Gow / TT
Sweden's Greta Thunberg has donated a $100,000 prize she won for her climate activism to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) to help children affected by the coronavirus pandemic, the world body said on Thursday.

“Like the climate crisis, the coronavirus pandemic is a child rights crisis,” Thunberg, 17, was quoted as saying in the UNICEF statement.

“It will affect all children, now and in the long term, but vulnerable groups will be impacted the most,” she added.

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“I'm asking everyone to step up and join me in support of UNICEF's vital work to save children's lives, to protect health and continue education.”

The Danish anti-poverty non-governmental organization, Human Act, will match the $100,000 donation, the statement added.

UNICEF said the funds would give it a boost as it struggles to support children impacted by anti-virus lockdowns and school closures, particularly in the fields of “food shortages, strained health care systems, violence and lost education.”

Thunberg said at the end of March that she had “likely” contracted the coronavirus, after experiencing several symptoms after a trip to central Europe.

What should you be doing to help reduce the rate of infection?

In Sweden, the official advice requires everyone to:

  • Stay at home if you have any cold- or flu-like symptoms, even if they are mild and you would normally continue life as normal. Stay at home until you have been fully symptom-free for at least two days.
     
  • Practise good hygiene, by regularly and thoroughly washing your hands with soap and water, using hand sanitiser when that's not possible, and covering any coughs and sneezes with your elbow.
     
  • Keep distance from all other people when in public places. That includes shops, parks, museums, and on the street, for example. The World Health Organisation recommends keeping at least a 1.5-2 metre distance.
     
  • Avoid large gatherings, including parties, weddings, and other activities.
     
  • Work from home if you can. Employers have been asked to ensure this happens where possible.
     
  • Avoid all non-essential travel, both within and outside Sweden. That includes visits to family, planned holidays, and any other trips that can be avoided.
     
  • If you have to travel, avoid busy times such as rush hour if you can. This reduces the number of people on public transport and makes it easier for people to keep their distance.
     
  • If you are over 70 or belong to a high-risk group, you should stay at home and reduce all social contacts. Avoid going to the shops (get groceries delivered or try to find someone who can help you), but you can go outside if you keep distance from other people. Read more about the help available to those in risk groups here.
     
  • By following these precautions, we can all help to protect those who are most at risk and to reduce the rate of infection, which in turn reduces the burden on Sweden's healthcare sector.
     
  • Read more detail about the precautions we should all be taking in this paywall-free article. Advice in English is also available from Sweden's Public Health Agency and the World Health Organisation.

 

 

 


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