SHARE
COPY LINK

COVID-19 RULES

Planning a road trip across Europe this summer? Here are some things to think about

Coronavirus restrictions are making travel more complicated within Europe. Land borders across the continent are generally open to travellers, but different restrictions and rules apply depending on the countries you travel through.  

Planning a road trip across Europe this summer? Here are some things to think about
A Spanish police officer at the border between France and Spain in March 2021. Photo: Raymond Roig/AFP

Each country continues to be responsible for the definition of its own entry requirements and rules, which are not standardised at the EU level. But there’s a general advisory against non-essential travel to countries outside the EU in effect until September 1st, 2021.

Information can be found on the Re-open EU website and Your Europe which pool information from all EU countries, but they are not always up-to-date.

It’s a good idea to check the individual websites for the countries you’ll be travelling to and through before you leave; you can also check the embassy or foreign ministry websites of your country of residence to look into rules specifically for travel from your country. 

The Local runs news sites in nine European countries. You can read them here to keep up-to-date on the pandemic situation:

Where can I travel now? 

This depends on where you’re starting from. If you’re coming from outside the EU, a European entry ban is in effect for some people, barring them from travelling to the European Union or the Schengen area unless the trip falls under one of the exemption categories (which differ per country) or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area (again, countries may have separate rules).

EU countries, as well as close partners such as Norway, are generally on the green lists for travel among other EU countries, but you still have to meet criteria such as being vaccinated or providing a negative Covid-19 test, and the exact rules may vary between countries.

What travel documents should be in my glove compartment?

If you’re an EU national, you still don’t need to show your national ID card or passport when you’re travelling from one border-free Schengen EU country to another – but you should definitely remember to bring it. 

On top of that, you’ll probably want to get yourself an EU Digital Covid Certificate (EUDCC), which allows restriction-free travel across EU and EEA countries following proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test. You can find out more about the EU Digital Covid Certificate here. Rules vary between countries, with one dose of vaccine enough to enter some countries, but others requiring two doses.

You generally get the certificate from your national health authority. It’s valid 14 days after receiving a complete regimen with any vaccine authorised by the EU and WHO, but as mentioned above, some countries will accept it after just one dose. It can also be used to prove that you’ve recovered from Covid-19 or have a recent negative test result.

On top of that, make sure your European health insurance card (EHIC) hasn’t expired, if you have one. It’s something that is often forgotten at the back of a drawer, but make sure it’s still valid because it covers healthcare costs in European countries outside your home, should you fall sick while travelling. Find out more here.

Bear in mind that the EHIC doesn’t cover everything and almost certainly won’t cover the cost of repatriation, should that be required, so you should consider buying travel insurance for the duration of your trip and keeping the key details like your policy number and the phone number to call if you need it in a safe place.

Phew! That’s a lot. What about the practical stuff? 

Not all EU countries have the same traffic rules, but some general rules apply in all EU countries.

It’s a good idea to keep a bunch of cash handy if you’re travelling through Italy or France because most of the E-roads in these countries require tolls on the road. Other countries, like Germany and Sweden, only require tolls over certain bridges, while smaller countries like Liechtenstein, Malta and Monaco offer toll-free driving. You can find out more about what tolls are required here

And of course, make sure you have a valid driving licence and sufficient car insurance that covers you in the EU. And remember that in Malta, Ireland and Cyprus, you drive on the left-hand side of the road.   

Bon voyage!

Member comments

  1. No mention of all the new speed cameras in France then but of course the British tourist will get away with it because unless physically stopped the means to fine them has been removed.

    1. Really well I know some people who received their speed fine notices with no problem so any Brit that thinks that they can’t get away with it think again.

  2. No mention of the biggest problem right now and i say this having just crossed Europe, TRAFFIC!

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

COVID-19

When should I get my next dose of Covid-19 vaccine in Sweden?

Covid-19 has not been classified as a "critical threat to society" in Sweden since April. But the Swedish Public Health Agency still recommends that everyone aged 12 and above get vaccinated. So when should you get your next dose?

When should I get my next dose of Covid-19 vaccine in Sweden?

As winter approaches, it’s a good time to check that you’re up to date on your booster shots.

If you’re aged 12 or older, the agency recommends that you should at least have completed your primary dose of the vaccine, which comprises two shots. Because vaccine efficacy wanes over time, if you are aged 18 and above, you should have already had your third dose.

The booster dose, called a påfyllnadsdos, can be administered a minimum of four months after the primary dose or the most recent booster. A booster shot is recommended even if you have tested positive for Covid-19 since your most recent vaccination, because the protection offered by a vaccine is more reliable than that offered by an infection.

The agency has also warned that the Omicron BA.5 variant spreads more easily than previous Covid-19 mutations.

Deliveries of two of the new vaccines targeting the new variant, Comirnaty Original/Omicron BA.1 and Spikevax bivalent Original/Omicron BA.1, have arrived in Sweden but have not yet reached all health regions, meaning it is not certain that if you will currently receive the updated vaccine. 

A third vaccine, an adapted version of the mRNA Covid-19 vaccine Comirnaty (Pfizer/BioNTech), is expected to arrive in Sweden in October. 

READ ALSO: When will the new Covid-19 vaccines be available in Sweden?

The höstdosen, or “autumn vaccine”

On September 1, the agency issued new guidelines for a höstdosen, or autumn vaccine dose.

During the campaign, all adults aged 18 and over who belong to an at-risk group are recommended to get a booster dose, as are seniors aged 65 and above. 

Risk categories include people who are pregnant, have a weakened immune system, have heart and lung diseases, or have Down syndrome.

You can get the autumn booster regardless of how many vaccine doses you may have received, which means it might be a fourth shot for some people, and a fifth for others.

The autumn vaccine is also available for those aged 18-64 who do not fall into any of the at-risk categories but would like a fourth dose. The Swedish Public Health Agency has said that regional health providers must make booster doses available to those who want them.

Chart showing recommended vaccination schedules. Chart: Folkhälsomyndigheten

Chart showing recommended vaccination schedules. Chart: Swedish Public Health Agency

How do I get an appointment for the autumn dose? 

Region Stockholm has been offering appointments for an autumn vaccination to everyone over 18 since September 12th. You can book a dose through the Alltid Öppet app

In Region Skåne, the region responsible for healthcare in Malmö and Lund, appointments for an autumn vaccine have been available since August 22nd. Appointments are available for vaccinations in Region Stockholm, as are drop-in times at locations listed on 1177.se.

In Region Västergötland, the region responsible for healthcare in Gothenburg, health centres, or vårdcentraler, are prioritising people aged 80 and older.

Those in other categories, including at-risk adults 18 and older and seniors over 65, are requested to make their vaccination appointments with other providers through 1177.se

SHOW COMMENTS