Sweden to publish timetable for vaccine booster doses next week

Sweden to publish timetable for vaccine booster doses next week
A nurse preparing a dose of vaccine for injection. Photo: Johan Nilsson/TT
Sweden's Public Health Agency will next week publish a timetable, telling adults when they can expect their third dose of Covid-19 vaccines, with the first adults under the age of 65 likely to get a booster dose before Christmas. 

According to the Dagens Nyheter newspaper, the Public Health Agency will next week publish a timetable, detailing when different categories of adult can expect their third dose of Covid-19 vaccine, with the first new groups under the age of 65 likely to get their booster dose before Christmas. 

Sweden’s state epidemiologist told the newspaper that his agency had held detailed discussions on Thursday with Sweden’s regional health authorities over which age groups, professionals, and vulnerable people should be prioritised.

“We need to reach the same capacity which we had at the end of the spring, which is why we are carrying out an intensive dialogue with the regional health authorities,” he told the newspaper.

I truly hope so,” he said when asked whether those in priority groups currently not being offered third doses might get their booster dose before Christmas. “It very much comes down to what capacity there is.”

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So far, third doses have been offered to everyone over the age of 65, home care visitors, and those living in care homes and supported housing, but some people over the age of 65 are currently finding it difficult to book appointments. 

There have been growing calls from regional health authorities for third doses to be given the healthcare personnel. 

According to the Sydsvenskan newspaper, the health authority in Skåne has decided to start giving left-over vaccine doses as booster shots to healthcare personnel if those in the prioritised groups cannot be called in at short notice. 

“According to our information, around four percent of doses end up being wasted, but that varies from place to place. Even if that seems a small number, it should still be jabbed into someone’s arm,” said Gilbert Tribo, a regional councillor with the Liberal party. 


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