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TODAY IN SWEDEN

Today in Sweden: A roundup of the latest news on Tuesday

Find out what's going on in Sweden today with The Local's short roundup of the news in less than five minutes.

Swedish PM Magdalena Andersson and Ulf Kristersson, leader of the Moderate Party, both observe Nato's Cold Response exercise in northern Norway.
Swedish PM Magdalena Andersson and Ulf Kristersson, leader of the Moderate Party, both observe Nato's Cold Response exercise in northern Norway. Photo: Anders Wiklund/TT

Two female staff die following Malmö school stabbing

Two women died after being stabbed at a high school in southern Sweden on Monday, police said, adding that an 18-year-old student had been arrested.

The two women, both in their 50s, “were employees of the school”, the police said in a statement following the attack at Malmö Latinskola, a secondary school in the centre of Malmö, the country’s third largest city.

Local media said the alleged attacker called the emergency number to say where he was and that he had put down his weapon and admitted to having killed two people.

He was armed with a knife and an axe, according to several Swedish media. The suspect was arrested without difficulty shortly after the arrival of the first patrol, according to the police account.

Read our story here 

Swedish vocab: en gärningsmän – a perpetrator 

Left Party split on cutting petrol tax 

More than 50 senior members of Sweden’s Left Party have written an open letter to the party leadership after it supported a proposal of the right-wing Moderate, Liberal, Christian Democrat, and Sweden Democrat parties to cut the price of petrol and diesel by four to five kronor by cutting tax.  

“We want to start a discussion. There are concerns about where are party is going on the environment question,” said Rikard Warlenius, a municipal politician in Stockholm. “Every time it comes to the crunch, many feel that environmental concerns have to take a back seat.” 

Swedish vocab: en uppgörelse – a deal, agreement

Swedish dairy cooperative Arla stops selling ‘Russian’ kefir 

Arla, Sweden’s biggest dairy cooperative, has temporarily stopped selling its fermented milk product Kefir, even though it is produced in Sweden, with all Swedish milk, and sold only to consumers in the country. 

“The packaging has an illustration of Moscow’s Red Square, and is associated with Russia in a way that doesn’t feel right in the current situation. So we are going to bring Kefir back with different packaging.” 

She said it was Red Square, with its connection to the ruling regime in Russia, which was a problem, rather than Russia in itself. 

“We have other products, such as smetana, for example, which also have onion domes on their packaging, which we have not withdrawn. It’s not Russian culture or Russian food we rejecting, but the Russian regime.”  

Swedish vocab: att förknippas med — to be associated with

Swedish PM and opposition leader observe Nato exercise in Norway 

Sweden’s Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson and Ulf Kristersson, leader of the Moderate Party, travelled to Evenes in Northern Norway on Monday to observe Nato’s Cold Response exercise. 

“There is a war going on in Europe, not far from where we are, so it’s natural that we, together, come to show our support for the Swedish military, who ultimately guarantee our democracy,” Andersson said at a joint press conference with Kristersson. 

“I want to emphasise how important I think it is that we can do this together,” Kristersson said. “When there is a war in Europe, it’s important that we can cooperate.” 

Troops from neutral Sweden and Finland are both taking part in the exercise, which is being led by Norway and involves troops from no fewer than 15 Nato countries. 

Around 1,500 Swedish troops and officers are taking party, together with JAS Gripen fighter planes. 

Swedish vocab: en övning — an exercise 

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TODAY IN SWEDEN

Today in Sweden: A roundup of the latest news on Tuesday

School attack trial, Turkish resistance, and Sweden to join Nato: find out what's going on in Sweden with The Local's roundup.

Today in Sweden: A roundup of the latest news on Tuesday
Kristianstad school attacker goes on trial
 
The 16-year-old boy who injured a teacher and a pupil in a stabbing at a school in Kristianstad goes on trial today. The boy had packed four knives into his bag before coming to the school. 
 
According to the prosecution’s investigation, the 16-year-old started planning the attack a week before it happened on January 10th, and had been in contact with his friend, who had been found guilty of carrying out a similar attack at another school in Eslöv last year. 

The trial in Kristianstad will last five days. 

Swedish vocab: att skada – to injure 

Turkey ‘will not say yes’ to Nato membership for Sweden, Finland: Erdogan

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday confirmed Turkey’s opposition to Nato membership for Finland and Sweden, again accusing them of failing to take a clear stance against terrorism. “We will not say ‘yes’ to those (countries) who apply sanctions to Turkey to join security organisation Nato,” Erdogan said.

Sweden has suspended any arms sales to Turkey since 2019 over Ankara’s military operation in neighbouring Syria. Referring to the Swedish and Finnish delegations’ intentions to meet with Turkish officials, Erdogan said: “They say they will come to Turkey on Monday. Will they come to persuade us? Excuse us, but they shouldn’t bother.”

Any membership bid must be unanimously approved by NATO’s 30 members. 

Swedish vocab: att bemöda sig – to bother oneself

Sweden to join Nato: ‘We are leaving one era and entering another”

Sweden on Monday officially announced it will apply for Nato membership as a deterrent against Russian aggression, entering a “new era” as it reverses two centuries of military non-alignment.

At a joint press conference held with Ulf Kristersson, leader of the opposition Moderate Party, Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson said joining the alliance would act as a deterrent against Russian aggression. 

“The government has decided to inform Nato that Sweden wants to become a member of the alliance,” she told reporters, a day after neighbouring Finland made a similar announcement.

“We are leaving one era and beginning another,” she said, adding that Sweden’s Nato ambassador would “shortly” inform Nato.

Ulf Kristersson, whose party has long supported membership of the alliance, said that he wanted to put party political differences aside to support the government in its decision.  

Swedish Vocab: att lämna en era – to leave one era 

Sweden’s Nato bid ‘no immediate threat to Russia’, says Putin

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said that Sweden and Finland joining Nato represented “no immediate threat to Russia”, but that if Nato begins to site military infrastructure on their territories Russia would respond.

Speaking at a meeting of the Collective Security Treaty Organisation, which groups Russia with Belarus, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, Putin seemed to tone down the threats to Sweden and Finland which have come in recent days from Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov and from his spokesperson Dmitry Peskov. 

“Russia has no problems with these states. There is no immediate threat to Russia,” he said at a meeting of the Collective Security Treaty Organisation, which groups Russia with Belarus, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. “But the expansion of military infrastructure into this territory would certainly provoke our response.” 

Swedish vocab: ett omedelbart hot – an immediate threat 

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