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TODAY IN SWEDEN

Today in Sweden: A roundup of the latest news on Tuesday

Falling house prices, parliament and Nato, and who needs Twitter? Find out what's going on in Sweden with The Local's roundup.

Today in Sweden: A roundup of the latest news on Tuesday
An estate agent puts out a sign ahead of a viewing of an apartment. Photo: TT

Sweden’s Social Democrats shut down Twitter account

Sweden’s ruling Social Democrat party is to shut down its Twitter account, saying it aimed “to focus on being out on the streets and in public squares to meet people”. 

“We will instead be on the streets and in squares, talking in workplaces and in stairwells and knocking on doors. You will even find us on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube,” the party wrote on Twitter. 

Johannes Svensson, a press spokesperson said that the party no longer felt that the “debate climate” on Twitter was “productive”. 

The party set up its account on the microblogging site in 2007. 

Swedish vocab: ett samtalsklimat – a debate climate 

Swedish opposition wants parliament to have role in Nato decision

Opposition parties are calling on Sweden’s government to today spell out the parliament’s role in handling a decision on whether or not to join the Nato security alliance.

Hans Wallmark, foreign policy spokesperson for the opposition Moderate Party, told the TT newswire that he expected an announcement to be made after the fifth meeting of the cross-party security policy analysis group, which is helping draw up the government’s new analysis of the changed security situation.

However, no announcement was made, and a press conference foreign minister Ann Linde had called for at 5pm was cancelled at short notice.

Swedish vocab: ett krav – a demand 

Swedish game publisher Embracer buys rights to ‘Tomb Raider’ and ‘Deux Ex’

Swedish video game publisher Embracer said on Monday that it had acquired three development studios responsible for hit games such as “Tomb Raider” and “Deus Ex” from Japanese publisher Square Enix.

The acquisition of the three North American studios Crystal Dynamics, Eidos-Montreal and Square Enix Montreal, totalled $300 million (285 million euros) and affects around 1,100 employees, Embracer said in a statement.

It also included the intellectual properties (IPs) for several best-selling franchises, such as “Tomb Raider,” starring British adventuring archeologist Lara Croft, who has been a video game character icon since her debut in 1996.

“We are thrilled to welcome these studios into the Embracer Group. We recognise the fantastic IP, world class creative talent, and track record of excellence that have been demonstrated time and again over the past decades,” Lars Wingefors, co-founder and CEO of Embracer, said in a statement.

Swedish vocab: att förvärva – to purchase 

Price of detached houses in Malmö and Stockholm falls three percent 

The price of detached houses in greater Malmö and greater Stockholm fell by three percent in April, showing signs that the property market in Sweden may be entering a downturn. 

“That it swings a bit up and down in some months isn’t so strange, but we are up at three percent, so that’s a pretty big change,” said Robert Boije, an economist at the state-owned mortgage lender SBAB. “The interesting thing now will be how durable it is.”  

The price of houses and apartments across the whole of Sweden fell just 0.8 percent. 

Swedish vocab: varaktig – durable 

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TODAY IN SWEDEN

Today in Sweden: A round up of the latest news on Friday

The rising cost of ice cream, coronavirus warnings and the hottest Midsummer in 50 years. Here's Sweden's news on Friday.

Today in Sweden: A round up of the latest news on Friday

Rising cost of ice cream

As you reach for something cool this Midsummer, you may notice that the price of ice cream has increased in Sweden.

According to Matpriskollen, their best-selling Magnum almonds are 13 percent more expensive this year and the price of Piggelin ice creams has risen by 24 percent.

The rising cost of energy and raw materials has made it more expensive for ice cream manufacturers to run their factories. 

“Many raw materials have risen quite sharply in price, everything from milk to plastic packaging”, Stefan Carlsson, CEO of the manufacturer Sia Glass said.

And if you’re wondering what happened to the ice cream Twister Spirello; it is currently unavailable in Sweden. The ice cream is manufactured in Russia, where GB Glace no longer import and export from, after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“We are actively working to find alternative manufacturing opportunities,” Sandhya Forselius, communications manager at Unilever, which owns GB Glace, wrote in an email to newswire TT.

Warnings over coronavirus spreading during Midsummer festivities as cases rise

A doctor in the Blekinge region has warned people to be cautious about joining in Midsummer parties if they have any Covid symptoms, as cases have doubled over the last four weeks.

“Think ahead this Midsummer, especially if you are going to celebrate with elderly and fragile people. Refrain if you feel the slightest cold,” infection control doctor Bengt Wittesjö said in a press release.

In the Blekinge region, the number of positive Covid cases has increased from six percent in week 21, to 44 percent in week 25 and there are now more people in hospital with Covid.

At the hospitals in Blekinge, protection measures such as masks have been reintroduced.

‘Hottest in 50 years’: Swedish Midsummer set to be a scorcher

This Midsummer could be Sweden’s warmest since 1970, weather forecasters say, with temperatures of up to 30 degrees expected for southern Sweden and between 20-25 degrees expected further north.

“It could potentially be the hottest Midsummer’s Eve in 50 years,” SVT’s meteorologist Tora Tomasdottir told the public broadcaster.

In 1970, temperatures of 34.4 degrees were measured in Köping on Midsummer.

“It’s not going to be that hot this year, but we could reach over the 31 degrees measured in Målilla six years ago,” she further told SVT.

“For those planning on partying all night long, you maybe don’t need to take that many extra layers with you, as it will be warm during the evening, too,” Tomasdottir told SVT.

The Swedish Public Health Agency is also warning people to take care in the heat by drinking plenty of fluids and trying to keep cool.

“In general, we in Sweden have a bad idea of ​​how dangerous the heat can be. It can be dangerous for everyone, not just for risk groups”, Elin Andersson, researcher in environmental health at the Swedish Public Health Agency, said.

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