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MY SWEDISH CAREER

My Swedish Career: ‘What I have found here is that the key to life is free time’

Federico Micolucci is a modern-day Venetian renaissance man, combining scientific research in water treatment at Gothenburg University with a second career as a techno DJ and label owner.

My Swedish Career: 'What I have found here is that the key to life is free time'
Federico Micolucci DJing at the Plan B nightclub. Photo: Private

Micolucci arrived in Sweden four years ago, when he won a post-doc position at Lund University researching energy-efficient water treatment technologies, and for the last two years, he has been commuting weekly to Gothenburg University, where he is further developing experimental methods to clean the water supply, using membrane filtration and activated carbon to remove pharmaceuticals and other harmful contaminants.

But Micolucci has for more than 12 years had a second life as an established techno DJ, and in Sweden he has somehow also found the time to spin records at raves and various clubs around Malmö, where he currently lives, creating his own music on a label (Eight of Cups) he founded with a fellow foreigner Gregory Vartian-Foss.

“On a creative level, this town is unique, golden,” he says of Malmö. “There’s real, dynamic energy in the arts scene, and you notice more and more that it is being recognised – internationally, even.” 

He met Vartian-Foss, a professional bass player with the Malmö Symphony Orchestra who comes from Los Angeles, three years ago, and they soon started bonding over a passion for rare Italo disco records. 

In their most recent project, they formed a trio with the Swedish multi-instrumentalist and singer Miranda Gjerstad, covering a rare, nearly forgotten gem of Italo disco, which they have reissued on vinyl, alongside their own cover version.

Vartian-Foss now creates his music in a shared studio in the growing creative haven of Norra Grängesbergsgatan, he previously produced his tracks at the arts and music venue, Inkonst, and he regularly performs alongside Gregory as resident DJ at Plan B – a frequently packed Malmö concert and club institution.

Federico Federico Micolucci examines a hollow fiber membrane. Photo: Private

At the same time, Micolucci’s research has been developing at a fast pace. He recently took over operations at an innovative waste-water treatment plant in Helsingborg, and this winter, he won the prestigious Marie-Curie fellowship for postdoctoral scientific research.

Micolucci has been impressed by the extent to which his Swedish fellow researchers and mentors have gone out of their way to make him feel comfortable in academic life.

“Generally speaking, the feeling I got from Swedish society was that people are polite, thoughtful, and seem to avoid prejudging. At the same time, it was a bit challenging as everyone started to push me (in a positive way, I might add) to listen to, speak, and immerse myself in the Swedish language.”

His experience of academia in Denmark and at home in Italy has shown him that the sector is marked by stiff competition, something he believes can be positive if helps drive innovation. In this Sweden is no exception, he says, with the main difference being the level of conflict avoidance. 

“Swedes are uncomfortable confronting people when something goes wrong,” he believes. “They try to keep a positive work environment, which is great – but this can sometimes lead to mistakes going uncorrected and unresolved misunderstandings. I don’t want to sound overly judgemental, but I think it’s just a stark difference from Italian society, in which people can be pretty direct and sometimes confrontational.”

Federico Micolucci in his day job as a scientist. Photo: Private

Federico’s eyes light up when talking about his new job in Helsingborg.

Part of Helsingborg’s urban renewal district, Oceanhamnen, the operational plant and research site is the world’s first full-scale filtration system of its kind.

“It’s the best job I have ever had,” he says. “My Swedish colleagues are supportive, welcoming every day, and positive in a real way. They encourage employees to be comfortable and maintain a good work-life balance. At the same time, they believe in making strides in research and finding solutions to improve the ways in which we interface with the environment. It’s a great feeling. Rarely before, did I wake up every day feeling good about going to work.” 

Micolucci still misses his native Italy, which he describes as “the most beautiful country in the world, taking into account the combination of landscapes, architecture, and food”, but he makes do with keeping in touch with friends and family in Venice on the phone, and making regular trips back home. 

“It’s harder to live there and much more stressful from a working perspective,” he says. “What I have found here in Sweden is that the key to life is free time. Sure, work is important, but it can’t always be the priority in life, and many companies, at least in my field, understand this. I’m able to develop my passions and spend time with my beloved friends, doing what I love – much more than would be possible back home. “

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MY SWEDISH CAREER

My Swedish Career: How I became Swedish Lapland’s first local wedding planner

Lisa Tousignant’s Swedish journey began with her taking a teaching job with IES in Stockholm. This month, she launched Arctic Lapland’s first wedding planning company.

My Swedish Career: How I became Swedish Lapland's first local wedding planner

Tousignant’s new company, Arctic Weddings of Lapland, opened for bookings on July 1st, and she is now focusing on arranging weddings for the coming winter season. You can see some images of weddings Tousignant has done on the company’s Instagram account. 

The idea came to her after colleagues she worked with while employed as the wedding coordinator at Icehotel, in Jukkasjärvi outside Kiruna, told her they often got weddings queries from both abroad and within Sweden.

“The photographers and the florist that I work with said they got calls all the time from people wanting to plan  weddings, but who had no idea where to start,” she said. “There’s no one doing destination wedding planning for Swedish Lapland who actually lives here and this area has so much to offer.”

Icehotel, the big international tourist draw in Jukkasjärvi, hosts dozen of weddings each year and Tousignant is set to continue her relationship with the hotel next year by doing wedding day coordinating. She hopes that Arctic Weddings of Lapland can build on the success that Icehotel has had with their customisable packages by offering different options for adventure within the whole region for winter and summer as well.

“I just had all this support from local people encouraging me to do it, because there’s so many options up here for beautiful weddings and adventure elopements. It’s hard to know where to start and how to navigate all the possibilities.” she says “The overwhelming support made me realise I have been building this idea in my heart for so long and wedding planning is what it is.”

 

A wedding at the Björkliden Mountain resort near Kiruna. Photo: Rebecca Lundh

She wants to what she calls “adventure weddings”. This week she was visiting the Nutti Sámi Siida offices to discuss collaborations. She plans to work with Fjellborg Arctic Journeys, who arrange dogsled trips and have a beautiful lodge camp that could accommodate large wedding parties. With her connection to Tornedalen, she plans to work with Huuva Hideaway, who specialize in Sami food, culture and history, and is also hoping to collaborate on events at Lapland View Lodge and Art Hotel. “i’m going to work my way down Norrbotten from Kiruna to Luleå connecting with all the venues and suppliers, “ she laughs.

 Tousignant’s journey towards being an Arctic wedding planner began 15 years ago when she left what she describes as “a successful career” doing public relations for CBC Television in Canada. 

“It just felt like life was supposed to be more than going back and forth to a job I didn’t love anymore,” she remembers, “I quit…sold all my stuff and went to Central and South America where I worked in hostels and roamed around for nearly two years getting to know myself in my mid-30’s.”

After her two years of travelling, she applied for teacher training college in Canada, got hired by Internationella Engelska Skolan (IES), and moved to their school in Nacka outside Stockholm. She thens taught at IES, and then at Futura Skolan International, for nearly 6 years, before following her sambo Martin Eriksson to the far-North of Sweden. 

“My sambo and I decided to have kids, “ she explains. “Making this decision really pushed him into wanting to change careers and follow his dream of becoming a shoe maker. We really try to support each other in following our dreams, so he moved up to Övertorneå in August while I stayed to complete my teaching contract.”

She moved up to Övertorneå in December, a week before their daughter was born. 
 
For her, moving to the far North of Sweden felt like coming home. “I immediately loved the North! People up here are chatty and friendly and very open.”
 
They lived in Övertorneå for almost three years, while Eriksson built up a successful bespoke boot business. But the Covid-19 pandemic reduced custom, and Eriksson took a job in Malmö shooting videos for the local police. But Malmö did not suit them. 
 
“After living in such a sleepy town, having two kids in the city was overwhelming and everyone missed the snow, so we took the first job opportunities we could in Norrbotten, my sambo [shooting video]for IRF (The Swedish Institute of Space physics) and me for Icehotel,” she says. 
 
 

An image from the website of Arctic Weddings of Lapland. Photo: Arctic Weddings of Lapland.
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