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Team Curry

Curry recipes, info, and general chat

Mahmood
post 17.Dec.2007, 04:41 AM
Post #16
Joined: 19.Nov.2006

QUOTE (evakaram)
I love Roti or Paratha...tried to make it but it just wasn't right. I think its because of the plain flour I used.


Paratha are made from plain flour with no secret recipe. The only thing you need to know is how to play with flour.
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Alfredo
post 17.Dec.2007, 08:00 AM
Post #17
Joined: 1.Dec.2005

Great thread. Thanks for the recipes, Princess.
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Mzungu
post 17.Dec.2007, 10:38 AM
Post #18
Location: Jönköping county
Joined: 29.Aug.2004

Dahl Curry...Tried this one last week,takes time but it was well worth the effort.

Have now a generous stock of coconut milk, and curry leaves,in preparation for the next!

1 cup skinned dahl or yellow split peas
1/8 tsp. ground tumeric
1 tbls. peeled and very finely chopped shallots
1 tsp. ground cumin seeds
3-4 whole fresh green chillies slit down their middle
4 tbls. vegetable oil or 2 tbls. coconut oil and 2 tbls. ghee
1/2 tsp. whole black mustard seeds
10-12 fresh or dried curry leaves
1-2 whole hot dried red chillies broken up into 2-4 pieces each
2 tbls. peeled and finely sliced shallots
2 cloves garlic peeled and finely chopped
5 oz. (1 medium) sized tomato chopped
3/4 - 1 tsp. salt
1 1/4 cups tinned or fresh unsweetened coconut milk


Pick over the dal and wash it in several changes of water; drain. Put in a heavy based pan and add 3 3/4 cups water as well as the tumeric. Bring to a boil. Turn the heat to low and cover, leaving the lid slightly ajar. Simmer the dal for about 45 minutes.

Now put in the chopped shallots and ground cumin. Stir, cover in the same way as before and cook for another 15 minutes. Add the green chillies and cook for 10-15 minutes or until the dal is tender. If the dal seems too thick at any point, add up to 1/2 cup of boiling water.

The dal, at this stage should be like a thick paste-like soup. Leave on a very low heat as you complete the final step.

Heat the oil in a small frying pan over a medium flame. When hot put in the mustard seeds. As soon as the mustard seeds begin to pop. (this take a few seconds) put in the curry leaves and the red chillies. When the red chillies darken (this happens almost immediately) put in all the sliced shallots and garlic. Stir and fry until the shallots turn a reddish-brown color. Now add the tomato pieces. Stir and fry until they soften.

Pour the entire contents of the small frying pan into the dal. Add the salt and mix. Add the coconut milk and stir it in. The dal may be cooked several hours ahead of time and then reheated.
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Fishtank
post 17.Dec.2007, 12:57 PM
Post #19
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

QUOTE (evakaram)
I love Roti or Paratha...tried to make it but it just wasn't right. I think its because of the plain flour I used.

Maybe someone has a recipe, and knows exactly what type of flour to use for them. Found some frozen ones in an ethnic shop, they were nice but expensive.


One shall use wheat flour for making good Chapathis. Its all about kneading it well and keeping it for couple of hours in warm place so that rolling its becomes smooth operation.

While kneading flour, use a bit warm water and little oil and a dash of salt.

The correct recipe shall be posted from home from indian recipe book. Hold on please.

A makeshift option is Whole wheat tortillas, just heat them on pan before eating. Keep on circulating it on hot pan for 10 seconds each side, there you go.
8 pack cost 10 sek in Netto
Wheat ones cost 15 sek with 8 pieces in netto or in Co-op /ICA like places be ready to pat even 22 sek for same stuff. Wondering why so much difference. :shock:
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Mzungu
post 17.Dec.2007, 01:17 PM
Post #20
Location: Jönköping county
Joined: 29.Aug.2004

QUOTE (FishTank)
One shall use wheat flour for making good Chapathis.


Yes it's wheat flour,specifically called Atta flour,best results for Chapatis, contains the correct percentage of bran and offal,also made from a hard type wheat!

*know my flour*
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Princess P
post 17.Dec.2007, 04:27 PM
Post #21
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

(Taken from The Curry Secret - Indian Restaurant Cookery At Home)

PARATHAS

These are made with the same flour as chappatis but are layered with ghee before being cooked on the tava with more ghee brushed on to them. Vegetable oil is sometimes used instead of ghee and this is perfectly acceptable although I feel the ghee produces the best flavour. Alternatively you may use butter. This, because of the water content in butter, results in a softer, less crisp paratha which I love. It really is a matter of personal preference and convenience which you use, and you may like to try all three before making up your mind.

Makes 6-8

Preparation and cooking time: 30 minutes approx

8 oz (225g) chappati flour plus extra for dusting*
4 fl.oz (100ml) water (approximately)
6 tablespoons of melted ghee


Make the dough as for chappatis** and leave to rest for 15-30 minutes.
Put the tava*** or cast-iron frying pan on to a medium heat. Meanwhile divide the dough into 6-8 equal portions.
Take one portion with floured hands and roll into a ball.
Place the ball of dough into the flour and press flat, dusting on both sides.
Roll out into a 6 inch (15cm) round, and bruch the surface with melted ghee.
Now fold by taking opposite sides and folding until they meet in the middle. You should have a long rectangular shape.
Brush the top surface again with melted ghee and fold, this time bringing in the ends of the rectangle to meet in the middle.
Brush the dry surface for the final time with melted ghee and fold in half. You should have a square.
Place this in the flour, press flat and roll out into a 8 inch (20cm) square.
Pat between your hands and slap onto the hot tava. Cook for about 30 seconds whilst brushing the top surface liberally with ghee. Turn over.
Again brush the surface uppermost with the ghee and turn over, having given the second side 30 seconds.
Continue to cook the first side for a further 30 seconds whilst brushing more melted ghee onto the top surface.
Turn over for the final time and cook for a further few seconds.
Both sides should have reddish brown spots. The frequent turning over ensures even cooking.
Put the paratha on a plate lined with a large piece of aluminium foil. Fold over the foil to keep the paratha warm while you make all the parathas in this way.
Like chappatis, parathas are best eaten immediately but are quite good re-heated.

Notes

* Chappati flour is a finely ground wholemeal flour called ata. If you can't get it use a mix of 3 cups of normal wholemeal flour to 1 cup of plain white flour instead.

** To make chappati dough.
Put the flour into a bowl. Add the water a little at a time and bring the flour together with the finger tips.
As the dough becomes stickier, draw it together with your hands, adding more water until all the flour is incorporated and you have a soft pliable dough.
Knead the dough with wet hands for a minute or two. Fold into a neat shape, dampen the surface, cover and leave to rest for at least 15 minutes.

***A tava is a slightly concave, cast-iron plate and the nearest thing to one would be a heavy cast-iron frying pan.
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evakaram
post 17.Dec.2007, 07:33 PM
Post #22
Joined: 8.Apr.2005

Thanks for the recipes, i will try them as soon as I buy the flour, wondering where to find it and what its likely to be called here. Cheers.
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evakaram
post 17.Dec.2007, 08:57 PM
Post #23
Joined: 8.Apr.2005

What about Roti...is this made with yeast? I wouldn't mind a recipe for those too.
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Princess P
post 17.Dec.2007, 09:39 PM
Post #24
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

QUOTE (evakaram)
Thanks for the recipes, i will try them as soon as I buy the flour, wondering where to find it and what its likely to be called here. Cheers.


I don't know where abouts you live but here's a link to details of Indian food suppliers in Goteborg. (Thanks again FishTank)

http://www.thelocal.se/discuss/viewtopic.p...ght=indian+food
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evakaram
post 17.Dec.2007, 09:44 PM
Post #25
Joined: 8.Apr.2005

I live in Stockholm. I often go to the Asian shops for various things so they may have the flour there.
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Fishtank
post 17.Dec.2007, 09:44 PM
Post #26
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

QUOTE (evakaram)
What about Roti...is this made with yeast? I wouldn't mind a recipe for those too.


No, no yeast and anything like that as per as I know. But perhaps it will be more tricky to make tandoori roti as one need to have tandoori oven to make it.
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Princess P
post 17.Dec.2007, 09:45 PM
Post #27
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

QUOTE (evakaram)
What about Roti...is this made with yeast? I wouldn't mind a recipe for those too.


I've never heard of this and its not in my book. I looked it up in my cookery encyclopedia and its says roti is the name of the poultry and game course in a formal dinner, which I assume is not what you meant. So, what is it and does it go by any other name?
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Princess P
post 17.Dec.2007, 09:49 PM
Post #28
Location: Not in Sweden
Joined: 19.Dec.2006

QUOTE (FishTank)
No, no yeast and anything like that as per as I know. But perhaps it will be more tricky to make tandoori roti as one need to have tandoori oven to make it.


My Indian cookery bible says that you can get pretty much the same effect as a tandoori oven by turning the temperature of your oven up to full and using the top shelf. I tried it this evening for tandoori chicken and it worked. Although the heat of the tray went right through my oven gloves and burnt my fingers. sad.gif
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evakaram
post 17.Dec.2007, 10:00 PM
Post #29
Joined: 8.Apr.2005

The Roti I am talking about is fried in a bit of oil and its sort of flaky and thickish.
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Fishtank
post 17.Dec.2007, 10:09 PM
Post #30
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 25.May.2007

Roti, is another name for Indian Bread specially in up northern parts of Indian subcontinent they call Indian Bread as roti.

evakaram, the one you refer to also called as Chapathi in few parts of India. The way you said it, it MUST be either Chapathi or Parathas.

Chapathi: You make it from well kneaded wheat flour by rolling it in circular shape and then frying it on hot pan with very little oil drops on pan.

Paratha is also a kind of Chapathi, but you use some sort of fillings before rolling it in circular shape. Then you fry i t the same way.

Hope this is helpful.

Now trying to recall which are the places in Stockholm area where you can buy Chapathi flour we are talking about.

Or you mean deep fried one?? Thats Poori...wink.gif
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