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Making Mince Pies from Swedish Ingredients

For the Brits (and Irish) amongst us...

irishmark
post 29.Nov.2009, 12:53 PM
Post #1
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 28.May.2009

Well the other half has done her annual batch of home made pepparkakor and, though I will probably eat most of them on my own again, I've just finished baking a kilo of Christmas mincemeat in preparation for this year's batch of mince pies. After 3 hours stewing in the oven, it smells superb - memories of mince pies came flooding back to my tastebuds as soon as I took it out of the oven!

I thought I'd share if anyone else fancies having a go - all done with ingredients from your local ICA (...and systembolaget of course).

Mincemeat
(adapted from http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database...eat_8893.shtml)
For ~1kg (2lb) mincemeat:
115g raisins (russin)
150g ICA russin mix, roughly chopped
35g Apelsinskal (cut/candied orange peel)
35g dried dates, roughly chopped
115g soft brown sugar
150g cooking apples - peeled, cored and grated
75g Talg (suet / animal fat), put in the freezer for 30 minutes - then grate
grated rind and juice of 1 orange
grated rind and juice of 1 lemon
20g chopped almonds (mandel)
20g chopped pecan nuts
(I find it easier to buy the nuts whole and wizz them in a small blender)
1 pinch (1.25ml) ground cinamon (malen kanil)
1 pinch (1.25ml) ground allspice (malen kryddpeppar)
1/2 tsp (2.5ml) ground nutmeg (malen muskot/muskotnött)
50ml brandy

Method
1. Mix all the ingredients together, except half the brandy in a large ovenproof bowl and cover and leave to stand overnight.
2. The next day, preheat the oven to 110C, cover the bowl with foil and place in the oven for about 3 hours.
3. Allow to cool, then mix in the rest of the brandy

Note: If possible, this mincemeat needs to mature for at least two weeks before using. Once sealed, it can keep for at least a year.

Mince Pies
(Makes 36 pies, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database...es_73207.shtml)
Ingredients
1kg high quality mincemeat, see above
600g plain flour, sifted
120g light brown muskovado sugar
225g ground almonds (mandel)
375g unsalted butter, diced
3 large free-range eggs, beaten
milk, to glaze

Method
1. Lightly butter a 12-hole pie or patty tin. Tip the mincemeat into a bowl and stir so that the liquid is evenly distributed.
2. Place the flour, sugar, almonds and butter in a food processor and process briefly until resembling breadcrumbs, then slowly add the egg through the feeder tube. (Or rub the butter into the dry ingredients by hand and stir in the egg.)
3. Bring the mixture together with your hands, wrap in clingfilm and chill for an hour or so. Thinly roll out the pastry on a floured surface. Cut out 12 circles with a fluted pastry cutter, large enough to fill the base of the prepared tin. Press gently into each hole, then fill with the mincemeat.
4. Cut out another 12 slightly smaller discs and use to cover the mincemeat. Press the edges together to seal. Make a small slit in the top of each, then brush lightly with milk. Chill for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 200C.
5. Bake the pies for 20 minutes until golden brown. Remove to a wire rack and serve warm.
6. Repeat two more times

I did a batch last year and they'll easily keep until the end of December (also did a few filled with Apple, but they go off quite quickly). Enjoy, and have a Merry Christmas!
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Rick Methven
post 29.Nov.2009, 01:34 PM
Post #2
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

The problem is that Talg is not Suet.

Suet is the hard fat from around the kidneys of cows and sheep that has a high melting point. Talg is just animal fat. My wife (who works for ICA) says that Talg can contain pork fat. As I am allergic to pork, I stick to Robinsons mincemeat from the English Shop
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Nemesis
post 29.Nov.2009, 01:50 PM
Post #3
Location: Skåne
Joined: 14.Apr.2009

In which cities are the english shops?

I really need sausages. I have tried making them, but I can not make them as good as those from the shops back home. Next time I am back home to my parents, i am going to try to annoy my father to teach me how to make sausages.
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Nemesis
post 29.Nov.2009, 01:51 PM
Post #4
Location: Skåne
Joined: 14.Apr.2009

QUOTE (irishmark @ 29.Nov.2009, 12:53 PM) *
Well the other half has done her annual batch of home made pepparkakor and, though I will probably eat most of them on my own again, I've just finished baking a kilo of Ch ... (show full quote)

I think I will try this:)
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irishmark
post 29.Nov.2009, 01:52 PM
Post #5
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 28.May.2009

Well, if you're allergic to pork that's a good reason! I've read in quite a few places though that it's a good enough substitute for the rest of us - you can even substitute butter although it will give a slightly different flavour - and if you're using it in other recipes you need to be aware that...
"Pre-packaged suet sold in supermarkets is dehydrated suet. It is made mixed with flour to make it stable at room temperature. Because of this, some care is needed when using it for older recipes that call for fresh suet as the proportions of flour to fat can alter. Most modern recipes stipulate packaged suet." (from wikipedia)
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*Trowbridge H. Ford*
post 29.Nov.2009, 02:02 PM
Post #6


Waste of time to make your own papparkakor.

Nyåkers Hjärtan beats anything you can cook on your own. Even my girlfriend, a professional baker, especially to cakes and cookies, agrees.

She just doesn't do papparkakor anymore.
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Rick Methven
post 29.Nov.2009, 02:04 PM
Post #7
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

"In which cities are the English shops?

I really need sausages. I have tried making them"

The English shop: http://www.englishshop.se/

is in Göteborg and Stockholm you can also order online but postage is expensive. They have frozen sausages but they are pork only and crap.

Taylors and Jones located at Hantverkargatan 12 in Stockholm : http://www.taylors.se/

Make real Irish/Welsh sausages which would be more up your street and they hold a sausage making course
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Rick Methven
post 29.Nov.2009, 02:09 PM
Post #8
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

http://www.ochef.com/657.htm

quote:
"very few people cook with suet these days, and most run screaming from any recipe that even mentions the stuff. If you can't bear the thought of using suet, you can certainly substitute solid vegetable shortening — which also has a relatively high melting point — for suet in most recipes and few people will notice."
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*Trowbridge H. Ford*
post 29.Nov.2009, 02:11 PM
Post #9


If served traditional mince pie, the only part I eat is the suet - what makes me such a bird! tongue.gif
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Puffin
post 29.Nov.2009, 04:27 PM
Post #10
Location: Dalarna
Joined: 5.Apr.2006

There was a long 3 page thread about mince piesjust a couple of weeks ago
http://www.thelocal.se/discuss/index.php?s...mp;hl=mince+pie

I put up my recipe that I adapted from an old English Cookery Book from the 1930s - it gives you the option of using melted butter or margarine in place of suet - the results are much nicer than the suet variety and it means you can offer them to veggie friends as well


Mincemeat (stick to either metric or imperial weights:
100g/4oz shredded suet/grated hard vegetable fat OR melted butter/margarine(1)
a small- medium grated apple
500g/1lb mixed dried fruit (2)
100g/4oz sugar - preferable demerera or raw sugar (rå socker/brun farin – the sticky sort)
100-150g/ 4-6 chopped or sliced nut (almonds and or walnuts) (3)
100g/4oz mixed peel (apelsinskal or kakfyllning)
Finely grated rind and juice of one large lemon
1 teaspoon of mixed spice(3)
½ teaspoon cinnamon (kanel)
½ teaspoon grated nutmeg (muskot)
(Optional extra 100g/4ox of chopped glace cherries)
(Optional 4 tablespoons of brandy/whisky/sherry or rum)

Mix all ingredients together. Put into airtight plastic tub or clean, dry jam jars and cover. Store in a cool place. The bottom of the fridge works well

This recipé needs to be made at least a week before using so that all the flavours can infuse.

Do not reduce the quantity of fat and sugar or the mincemeat will not keep.

Notes:
1) the melted margarine is a lot easier in Sweden and the results taste fine but for traditionalists suet is usually available by mail-order from the English Shop - at a price

2) Can be a problem to get the ready mixed in Sweden - although again it can be obtained from the English shop – I usually make up my own mixture of raisins (russin), sultanas (sultana russin), currants (korrinter), a little and even some chopped dried apricots and glacé cherries. Works really well as I can have more sultanas and less currents

3) Mixed spice is available at the English shop – but if I can’t get there I us I use pepparkakas krydda which works really well
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Rick Methven
post 29.Nov.2009, 04:36 PM
Post #11
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

Trowbridge: Thought I'seen you somewhere

Attached Image
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*Trowbridge H. Ford*
post 29.Nov.2009, 05:20 PM
Post #12


Thanks, Rick, pleased to be mistaken for an American red-headed woodpecker. Used to see a lot of them back in Massachusetts.

Actually, Scandinavia has a wonderful selection of woodpeckers, and I wouldn't mind being mistaken for one of them too. My favorite is the larger green woodpecker, but they don't show up that often. I have a family of great spotted woodpeckers who live here all year round, thanks, in part, to my regular feeding,

Birds are among the most intelligent creatures on the planet, adapting to its conditions constantly rather than trying to remaking the world to fit their myths, man's fatal obsession.
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Rick Methven
post 29.Nov.2009, 05:29 PM
Post #13
Location: Linköping
Joined: 30.Nov.2005

"Birds are among the most intelligent creatures on the planet, adapting to its conditions constantly rather than trying to remaking the world to fit their myths, man's fatal obsession"

Attached Image
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Ronbolama
post 29.Nov.2009, 05:49 PM
Post #14
Location: United States
Joined: 2.Sep.2009

QUOTE (Trowbridge H. Ford @ 29.Nov.2009, 04:20 PM) *
Thanks, Rick, pleased to be mistaken for an American red-headed woodpecker. Used to see a lot of them back in Massachusetts.Actually, Scandinavia has a wonderful selection of ... (show full quote)

Hear, hear Trowbridge! Maybe your words will encourage more and more birds to begin posting their fowl (sorry)
comments on The Local!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uELFbRBEvw
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irishmark
post 29.Nov.2009, 07:51 PM
Post #15
Location: Västra Götaland
Joined: 28.May.2009

QUOTE (Puffin @ 29.Nov.2009, 04:27 PM) *
There was a long 3 page thread about mince piesjust a couple of weeks agohttp://www.thelocal.se/discuss/index.php?s...mp;hl=mince+pieI put up my recipe that I adapted from an ... (show full quote)

Cheers for that Puffin. I did search before posting but am not sure if I mistyped or was just being a numptie as nothing came up. Might try butter next year, but have just tried a sample and it tastes fine this year with lard. Interesting that your 1930's recipe doesn't say to stew the mixture for 3 hours in the oven - having just done mine, I think the finished/stewed mixture probably is much closer to the consistency of the shop-bought stuff although either will taste great.

PS Agree with your earlier post that the home made mixture results in much better tasting pies ..and isn't exactly difficult to do from easily obtainable ingredients! Don't get me wrong, when I was still living in England I just bought some - but don't really feel it's much of a hardship to make my own now. One decent sized batch will see me through the season with enough to torment some natives with along the way smile.gif
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