The Local is not responsible for content posted by users.
  Reply to this topic

Why do foreign students choose to study in sweden

In light of news on quality of education/ lack of

Saywhatwhat
post 18.Apr.2018, 04:52 PM
Post #1
Joined: 15.Feb.2018

Just as the title of thread suggests...

In light of the article about the student who sued the Swedish university on grounds of insufficient quality of education, and won, why would foreign students choose a Swedish University?

Thanks to all who respond!
Go to the top of the page
+
satwork13
post 19.Apr.2018, 07:05 PM
Post #2
Joined: 3.Mar.2018

Can you please provide your sources?
Go to the top of the page
+
trzl
post 19.Apr.2018, 08:44 PM
Post #3
Joined: 29.Mar.2018

http://nordic.businessinsider.com/an-ameri...and-won-2016-6/

In the last paragraph: "She has not lost her faith in the Swedish education system"..

It seems like this was an isolated incident with one program at one university, otherwise there would be much more of these lawsuits considering that a precedent has been set.
Go to the top of the page
+
Alasela01
post 10.Jun.2018, 03:23 PM
Post #4
Joined: 10.Jun.2018

Hello,
i am new here.i just finished dropping my application for spring semester 2019.Please i need someone to tell me how i will go about submitting my documents and also how i willbe able to apply for scholarship because without scholarship i will not be able to afford the tuition fees and the rest
Go to the top of the page
+
Anisette
post 8.Sep.2018, 03:29 PM
Post #5
Joined: 28.Jul.2010

Because that was an isolated incident. I went to both a Swedish and an American University. I thought that the Swedish Uni was much better structured in terms of focus on the program I was interested in (education) then the American.
Go to the top of the page
+
Saywhatwhat
post 8.Sep.2018, 06:05 PM
Post #6
Joined: 15.Feb.2018

QUOTE (Anisette @ 8.Sep.2018, 04:29 PM) *
Because that was an isolated incident. I went to both a Swedish and an American University. I thought that the Swedish Uni was much better structured in terms of focus on the ... (show full quote)


Maybe should have stayed in an American school a little longer to learn the proper usage of then and than. smile.gif especially as an educator. Just being a smart ass. Sort of.

Were they both bachelor programs?

What drew you to the swedish university? That is my main question regardless of the lawsuit. Did you know the program in Sweden had a better structure before or after you were in the school?

I would agree that Sweden narrows people's focus in their educational path even entering into gymnasium, 9-12th grade, I believe. Don't know if that's a good or bad thing.

I personally think experience rather than more and more school is important to develop a focus, or path, of education for oneself. For instance, if you have a degree in education and become a teacher and then realize you would love to work with special needs kids. Hypothetically you could focus your continuing education on that rather than, hypothetically, getting a degree in teaching special needs kids first, before experience, and then finding out it isn't for you.

I have the utmost respect for educators wherever in the world they are, so don't think I'm shitting on your choices. Teachers are often disrespected when it is, I think, one of the most important professions.

Just curious what drew you to a swedish university. Did you have prior ties to the country?

I also recall being able to structure my classes as I saw fit, in my university experience in the states. Of course you need to fulfill certain credits but other than that it was all about progressive education towards the major/s and minor/s.
Go to the top of the page
+
Anisette
post 9.Sep.2018, 07:59 AM
Post #7
Joined: 28.Jul.2010

QUOTE (Saywhatwhat @ 8.Sep.2018, 06:05 PM) *
Maybe should have stayed in an American school a little longer to learn the proper usage of then and than. smile.gif especially as an educator. Just being a smart ass. Sort of.


Thank you for spotting the error. Although I don't know if it justifies an addition to my diploma but whatever floats your boat smile.gif

QUOTE
Were they both bachelor programs?


Yes. Although in different fields.

QUOTE
What drew you to the swedish university? That is my main question regardless of the lawsuit. Did you know the program in Sweden had a better structure before or after you were in the school?


I was in Sweden at the time. I knew that the Swedish university had a good path since I researched it before I started. Anyone does that before putting a large amount of time or money into something (or ,at least, should). I never understood that lawsuit. Why did the American go to such a no-name university? It is not like it was a specialised degree where only that university had the facilities for it or the name behind it. She could have gotten the same thing in the U.S.. Why did it take her two years to realize something was wrong? Didn't she tour their facilities/observe a class or two/ect. before starting?

QUOTE
I personally think experience rather than more and more school is important to develop a focus, or path, of education for oneself. For instance, if you have a degree in education and become a teacher and then realize you would love to work with special needs kids. Hypothetically you could focus your continuing education on that rather than, hypothetically, getting a degree in teaching special needs kids first, before experience, and then finding out it isn't for you.


If you have that luxury. Sometimes though, you have to work in fields you don't like because it pays the bills. Sometimes your employer won't care about your experience and just want to see the degree. Also, if you are wanting to work with special needs kids some schools won't let you start with just a basic education diploma (essentially doing a special educator's job with a general education diploma if that is what you are alluding to).


QUOTE
I also recall being able to structure my classes as I saw fit, in my university experience in the states. Of course you need to fulfill certain credits but other than that it was all about progressive education towards the major/s and minor/s.


I didn't like the fact that, in the U.S., you had to spend the first year taking more general courses that fufilled basic requirements to the University rather than go straight into your specialisation (at least at my school you had to get into the smaller college in the University which was another acceptance route). So I had to take classes in law, a physical education class, etc. Annoying to say the least. Not to mention the money it cost me. But it was the same route at other schools that were at that level.

At the Swedish one, I just jumped straight into my major, took my specialisations that arose out of analysing the market for them / reading the literature, etc. Much more streamlined.
Go to the top of the page
+
refreshedsuggestion
post 22.Jan.2019, 07:55 PM
Post #8
Joined: 14.Apr.2018

I got into the wrong field in France and our system doesn’t quite allow for mistakes. Once you’ve made a choice, there’s no changing your mind, especially not if you want to get into a highly pursued field (such as law, politics, psychology). I tried to get into political science and got rejected despite rather good grades because those fresh out of high school hold priority over everybody else and not all of them even get accepted into university because of a lack of resources and spots. Anyway. Applied to Sweden instead because I knew some Swedish. The process was simple and I was accepted without an issue.
I had obviously heard of Malmö university’s poor reputation but I was actually pleasantly surprised. Teachings are overall good quality. In my field, most of the teachers are coming from either Stockholm or Lund universities. Unless you wish to argue that they are willingly downgrading their teaching to adapt to Malmö’s intellectually limited population, there is no reason to believe that it would be of a lower quality than in the aforementioned universities. They are certainly a bit easy on bachelor’s students, however, myself included. But, that was already happening when I was studying at Sorbonne in Paris–not exactly the world’s worst university.
Another thing I like about Swedish universities is that we’re provided with functioning material and a great variety of literature. For free. Teachers introduced us to the university’s electronic library within the first week of school. In France, no teacher ever told us that we had free access to electronic journals with our university codes–until the third year.
Go to the top of the page
+

Reply to this topic
2 User(s) are reading this topic (2 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members: