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we need help

to rent a place

Wutzup
post 29.Mar.2017, 01:56 PM
Post #1
Joined: 5.Jan.2017

Need help urgently to rent or find a place to stay. We are a family (Wife, husband and an 11months daughter) from EU. Got a job but have to work for two months before i receive some money for my work. Social services couldnt help me at all. Tried everything. Out of options. Going back to my country will give me nothing. I will have to wait in a huge que on the street with a baby, before i get a room. Anybody can help us?
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yet another brit
post 29.Mar.2017, 02:18 PM
Post #2
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

Try http://www.bostaddirekt.com

Not cheap, mind, but...
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wallace1837
post 30.Mar.2017, 10:25 AM
Post #3
Joined: 21.Oct.2012

Swedish housing is dysfunctional. It might be better for families to stay out of Sweden. If you can get a job in a civilized country, where there is a rental market that is accessible, you should jump ship and go there. Yes, it will cost you in the short term, but civilization bring a world of possibility for families.

Here is a description of how Swedish housing (doesn't) work:
https://www.thelocal.se/discuss/index.php?s...st&p=830643
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intrepidfox
post 31.Mar.2017, 07:56 PM
Post #4
Location: Gothenburg
Joined: 18.Jul.2012

QUOTE (wallace1837 @ 30.Mar.2017, 10:25 AM) *
Swedish housing is dysfunctional. It might be better for families to stay out of Sweden. If you can get a job in a civilized country, where there is a rental market that is ac ... (show full quote)


People are asking for help. If you have nothing to say then shut the fuck up and go home to your mother
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wallace1837
post 1.Apr.2017, 10:09 AM
Post #5
Joined: 21.Oct.2012

QUOTE (intrepidfox @ 31.Mar.2017, 06:56 PM) *
People are asking for help. If you have nothing to say then shut the fuck up and go home to your mother

I will let the OP judge if the housing system of Sweden is a good fit for his family. I strongly believe that understanding the root of the problem is the first step to find a solution.
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axiom
post 1.Apr.2017, 12:13 PM
Post #6
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 24.May.2011

QUOTE (wallace1837 @ 1.Apr.2017, 10:09 AM) *
I will let the OP judge if the housing system of Sweden is a good fit for his family. I strongly believe that understanding the root of the problem is the first step to find a solution.

I'm fascinated as to why you still live in Sweden.
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Bsmith
post 1.Apr.2017, 03:33 PM
Post #7
Joined: 25.Jun.2009

He loves the weather.
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yet another brit
post 1.Apr.2017, 07:11 PM
Post #8
Joined: 5.Jan.2013

QUOTE (Bsmith @ 1.Apr.2017, 03:33 PM) *
He loves the weather.


Maybe he comes from Alaska...

Seriously...

I strongly believe that understanding the root of the problem is the first step to find a solution.

The problem is very simple - there aren't enough places to live in the places (or rather, place) that people want to live.

The root of the problem is more complex. The root isn't found by complaining, though.

At least in one way of thinking, perhaps it is a scaling problem - Sweden is a small country, with just one (sorry, Gothenburg) main centre that distorts the incentives; maybe the "normal" market-will-sort-it-out-eventually arguments don't hold, or rather, won't hold in a useful timeframe. In a nutshell - it doesn't matter how much it costs or how difficult it is to move to Stockholm, people still want to do so, and are likely to do so for the foreseeable future.

Now, there are plenty of solutions to this - of which "build more houses in Stockholm then" figures large. But that is, as they say, jam tomorrow.
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wallace1837
post 1.Apr.2017, 07:40 PM
Post #9
Joined: 21.Oct.2012

All jokes aside. Sweden work in a "Swedish point" system. The more Swedish you are the easier is your life.

The housing queue is one of the example of "Swedish point", where you get queue point from birth if your parents are clever enough. Another option is that your parents give you their points. When you need an apartment, you get it! If you are a foreigner, those Swedish points are not there when you need them to get an apartment.

No wonder why the OP struggle to find an apartment, the system is rigged against him.

The other options are:
- the black and grey market of sublet (with moving every 3 months being the standard).
- buying (he will need to have a few more Swedish points (his Swedish credit score) before a bank give him a mortgage) as he mentioned he's been here two months and didn't get any salary.

It is up to the OP to see if he wants to play the catch up game of Swedish points (housing, daycare location, school for his/her child, job for his/her partner, etc.).
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wallace1837
post 1.Apr.2017, 07:46 PM
Post #10
Joined: 21.Oct.2012

QUOTE (yet another brit @ 1.Apr.2017, 06:11 PM) *
The problem is very simple - there aren't enough places to live in the places (or rather, place) that people want to live.

High demand, low offer equal increase the price in a free market. That increased price leads to people who work can afford to live where work is.

In Sweden, high demand, low offer leads to the more "Swedish" you are (accumulated queue points by you or your family), the more likely you get an apartment where the jobs are.

So the problem of workers not being able to get an apartment is not because of offer/demand. It is because of the Swedish model.
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riemann
post 1.Apr.2017, 09:34 PM
Post #11
Joined: 30.Jan.2017

The housing system wouldn't be actually half bad if it wasn't as crooked as a dog's hind leg and there was some actual oversight. It becomes extremely difficult to compete against friends of friends that are routinely thrust to the front of lines and the outright discrimination against people with non-Swedish names and backgrounds.
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axiom
post 2.Apr.2017, 08:18 AM
Post #12
Location: Stockholm
Joined: 24.May.2011

QUOTE (wallace1837 @ 30.Mar.2017, 10:25 AM) *
Swedish housing is dysfunctional. It might be better for families to stay out of Sweden. If you can get a job in a civilized country, where there is a rental market that is ac ... (show full quote)

I disagree, I have lived in Sweden many years and I have never had a problem with somewhere to live. I have rented (first hand) owned bostadsrätt and in the end my own house. It is tough to find somewhere in Sweden to live, and the reason is simple: We are more that move into larger cities than the pace at which homes are being built. This is no rocket science. The government I would say failed to plan well and never expected this numbers of people moving here that have done so over the most recent years.

If you are trying to find somewhere to rent, its tough. Social housing is done through queues as is done in every other country I aware of. And the queues as long because there are many people like myself and many here that have moved here and want somewhere to live and are waiting in the queue. There are even people in the queue that own their own homes. We have been in the queue for over a decade and still are in the queue.

Easiest option for most people is to buy somewhere however prices can be high, largely since most people want to live in the centre of towns, not a bad idea but impractical. We chose not to take this option and look for places we could easily commute to, worked pretty well for us. As a bonus, it is quieter, less urban problems, and the children can even play in the street.

Alternatively you can find a second hand contract to rent, ie, rent from someone that has rented. These are tricky and are often more expensive, but likely your only choice outside of buying.

Check with your company, perhaps they can help with relocation?
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Svedallas
post 15.May.2018, 08:53 PM
Post #13
Joined: 21.Apr.2016

QUOTE (Wutzup @ 29.Mar.2017, 02:56 PM) *
Need help urgently to rent or find a place to stay. We are a family (Wife, husband and an 11months daughter) from EU. Got a job but have to work for two months before i receiv ... (show full quote)


You can't expect to get social services benefits when you haven't even worked and paid any taxes. Why have a baby when you cannot even be responsible enough to take care of it. Were you expecting Sweden to take care of you.

HA! Try again. Social service have criteria. And you would not be a priority.
You should have saved money before you had a child.
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nativeswedishengineer
post 28.May.2018, 04:22 PM
Post #14
Joined: 7.Nov.2017

QUOTE (wallace1837 @ 30.Mar.2017, 11:25 AM) *
Swedish housing is dysfunctional. It might be better for families to stay out of Sweden. If you can get a job in a civilized country, where there is a rental market that is ac ... (show full quote)


So, can you tell me what countries have a functional rental market, where you are allowed to live for two months without paying any rent in advance?
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whizzo
post 5.Jul.2018, 09:09 AM
Post #15
Joined: 4.Jul.2018

We've been here five months and have found there are plenty of short-term vacant properties in Sweden. Part of the problem is that for one reason or another, their owners don't feel the need to rent them out.

We're a family of four and couldn't find anything at all in the city with enough space within our fairly generous budget. The city's made mostly out of small apartments so competition is even fiercer for roomy places to live. You may have more luck using the excellent pub;ic transport system to find a place a little way outside of town.

As with most things Swedish, your network of friends and contacts in Sweden will probably provide the answer in the end. Can you put the word out at the place you'll be working that you're looking for something?
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